#1
so, i have heard a lot of good things about parker fly's and was wondering if you guys have ever played one because i always wanted to try one but the GC next to me doesnt carry any. also i was wondering why they are so expensive(except for the p-42). i ask this because after i get a mesa off of ebay i will be looking for a new guitar.
#2
They are fantastic, but definitely a play before you buy. Kind of a different feel than most guitars.

They are expensive because of they are constructed very well, they contain top-notch electronics, they feel awesome, and lots of technology and innovation went into them.

Other brands to look into: Carvin, Suhr, Vigier, Anderson
Dissonance is Bliss


Signal Chain:
Carvin CT-4
Ibanez TS-9
Carvin Quad-X
TC Electronics G-Major
Mesa/Boogie 2:90
Ear Candy BuzzBomb



Member #4 of the Carvin Club
#3
yeah the other ones except for carvin are way more expensive, and i always really wanted a unique guitar like a parker fly
#5
ive played one at the Music Reasource Center (this non-profit organization where kids can practice, record, play shows at etc. for $10 a year) and i love the feel of it, although there was an issue with the electronics where the high e string has very little sustain, but this is a place where people beat the **** outta the instuments (the gibson les paul goldtop w/ coil split literally has no pain or finish anymore)
Quote by RedDeath9
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#6
Quote by ironman1478
i was wondering why they are so expensive
Aside from the fact that they're MIA, which by itself adds a hefty premium, the Fly is a pretty complicated design to make. We have the parts: the pickups and preamp are exclusive to the design, as are the ball-bearing floating trem and the ultralight truss rod. The only OEM piece of Fly hardware I can think of are the Sperzel tuners, and even those are pretty much the most expensive locker set you can get.

Then the manufacture: they have to carve the stupidly thin figured body out, set the neck (and there isn't even a neck joint to speak of), then bake a sheet of carbon fiber to fit the back of the guitar and attach that. Then you get stainless frets on a carbon fiber fretboard and a neck that's thinner than anything Ibanez offers today. In the end the whole thing has 24 frets, active electronics, a float/dive/fixed trem, piezo pickups, stereo output, but it still weighs as much as a Les Paul headstock.

As far as the actual guitar, it's very much a matter of taste. Took me five minutes playing it to get over the weird looks (I actually think it's fairly pretty now) and even weirder price, but I don't imagine everyone would be the same way.
Fender Japan Stratocaster Ibanez Pro540 Power Ibanez Pro540 Saber Ibanez 430S Ibanez S540 Charvel LSXIII w/GraphTech Ghost MIDI Parker Fly Artist Ibanez S1220 Mesa F30 Roland GR20 Roland Microcube + IBANEZ TREMS STILL SUCK!
#7
i used to have a fly classic... the thing was awesome but i needed money so i sold it
2008 M.I.A. HSS Strat
Marshall JCM 900 50w Dual Reverb
#8
Quote by pifty
Then you get stainless frets on a carbon fiber fretboard and a neck that's thinner than anything Ibanez offers today


Yeah, that's one reason I never warmed up to it. The neck is excessively thin. Way
more than my Ibanez. I don't know if people realize how thin the Parker's necks are.
It seems to give the high E string VERY little tolerance for pulloffs. It's really easy to
pull it right off the fretboard.

It's definitely not a neck for everyone.

Looks-wise. Meh. Never cared much for how it looked. It's nice and light though.
#9
Quote by pifty
Aside from the fact that they're MIA, which by itself adds a hefty premium, the Fly is a pretty complicated design to make. We have the parts: the pickups and preamp are exclusive to the design, as are the ball-bearing floating trem and the ultralight truss rod. The only OEM piece of Fly hardware I can think of are the Sperzel tuners, and even those are pretty much the most expensive locker set you can get.

Then the manufacture: they have to carve the stupidly thin figured body out, set the neck (and there isn't even a neck joint to speak of), then bake a sheet of carbon fiber to fit the back of the guitar and attach that. Then you get stainless frets on a carbon fiber fretboard and a neck that's thinner than anything Ibanez offers today. In the end the whole thing has 24 frets, active electronics, a float/dive/fixed trem, piezo pickups, stereo output, but it still weighs as much as a Les Paul headstock.

As far as the actual guitar, it's very much a matter of taste. Took me five minutes playing it to get over the weird looks (I actually think it's fairly pretty now) and even weirder price, but I don't imagine everyone would be the same way.

damn that looks thin, but if it is that thin i think i should reconsider my choices. ibanez necks kind of give me a cramp. i think i should stick to jackson(i like to switch my brands up a lot so i get different kinds of tones)
#10
Quote by ironman1478
damn that looks thin, but if it is that thin i think i should reconsider my choices. ibanez necks kind of give me a cramp. i think i should stick to jackson(i like to switch my brands up a lot so i get different kinds of tones)


They actually make "chubby" neck Parkers, with a more traditional Strat-like thickness. The fretboards have a variable radius too, flatter towards the higher frets.

Still not saying it's the right guitar for you, you won't know until you play it.
Fender Japan Stratocaster Ibanez Pro540 Power Ibanez Pro540 Saber Ibanez 430S Ibanez S540 Charvel LSXIII w/GraphTech Ghost MIDI Parker Fly Artist Ibanez S1220 Mesa F30 Roland GR20 Roland Microcube + IBANEZ TREMS STILL SUCK!
#11
I have a Parker PM 20, which is their budget range, made in Korea, its a great guitar for the price and worth a look if your after a Parker but dont want to cough up the full whack for a MIA one.