#1
Started playing electric guitar 5 months ago... been concentrating on the A minor pentatonic Blues scale for the most part which i've gotten to know pretty well and can play it all over the fretboard (also in the Key of G and C too).

I need to add some "feeling" to my playing but i try to embellish it with slides, bends, hammer-ons etc. I mostly improvise my own licks, but have learnt a few standard ones.

What's the next stage... Is there another complementary scale/mode that i should now progress to so i can mix it in with the pentatonic scale to add a bit more "colour/variety"?

Thanks for any advice.

p.s. I also learned part of the Ab Major Scale cause i really liked the sound of it after watching a video of it.
Last edited by geetarmanic at May 6, 2008,
#2
Being the cornerstone of nearly all of Western theory, the major scale would be a good bet.
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#3
yeah, the full major and minor scales, with the extra notes that arent in the pentatonic. the pentatonic takes out the "ickier" notes. theyre great for soloing over....
#4
^ Thanks. Are you referring to the Major Pentatonic Scale, or the Major Scale... these two are different, right? If i learned the A Pentatonic Major Scale for example, could i then hop between that and the A Minor Pentatonic Scale within the same solo?
#5
major and minor should stay away from eachother... unless you use the relative minor to a major

im not completely 100% sure, so dont quote me on this, but you can play a F minor pentatonic over an A major, but like i said, not sure..

EDIT: looked it up and what do ya know? im right.
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#6
Quote by icon_player_5
major and minor should stay away from eachother... unless you use the relative minor to a major

im not completely 100% sure, so dont quote me on this, but you can play a F minor pentatonic over an A major, but like i said, not sure..

EDIT: looked it up and what do ya know? im right.


It'd be F# minor pentatonic.. but it would just act as A major pentatonic, as they have the same notes.
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#7
Quote by geetarmanic
If i learned the A Pentatonic Major Scale for example, could i then hop between that and the A Minor Pentatonic Scale within the same solo?


Yep, very common blues/rock approach to soloing
#8
Quote by Stash Jam
Yep, very common blues/rock approach to soloing


Okay, but one of the earlier posts said, "major and minor should stay away from each other... unless you use the relative minor to a major"...

... any further clarification?
#9
Quote by geetarmanic
Okay, but one of the earlier posts said, "major and minor should stay away from each other... unless you use the relative minor to a major"...

... any further clarification?


Take a 12 bar blues in A progression (uses these chords- A7 D7 E7) -both A major & A minor pentatonic will work well over it and both can and will often be used in the same solo. Look at solos by well known blues guitarists and you will see this concept being used a lot
Last edited by Stash Jam at May 6, 2008,
#10
Switching between minor and major pentatonic works with blues because all the chords are, or can be, dominant 7ths.. It may not work in other situations, depending on the chords and the progression.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

last.fm
#11
I personnaly love the Hirojoshi / Kumoi minor japanes pentatonic scale. Very easy and well-sounding (quite exotic)
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#12
I agree with Archaon. Learn the major scale properly, not just one finger pattern. This means, understand the intervals that it's made up of, so that you can construct any major scale. That way you don't only learn the patterns but you understand them too, allowing you to make up your own patterns, which in some situations may be more convenient over others.
#13
Quote by geetarmanic
Okay, but one of the earlier posts said, "major and minor should stay away from each other... unless you use the relative minor to a major"...

... any further clarification?


"Blue notes" are considered b3, b5 and b7. A b3 IS minor, but can be used over
a major to yield a bluesy flavor. Minor pentatonic over a major chord is done
ALL the time in blues and rock (jazz too at times). But, you can also use major
pentatonic, which is after all major too. That tends to give a more "country"
flavor.
#14
Thanks for all the help, guys... in fact, just recorded a couple of Pentatonic Blues licks, check out my signature if interested.
#15
Quote by icon_player_5
im not completely 100% sure, so dont quote me on this, but you can play a F minor pentatonic over an A major, but like i said, not sure.

You wouldn't be playing F# minor pentatonic over something in A major. Since your tonal center is A you're just playing the A major scale.

TS: Learn the major scale first, not the major pentatonic scale. Make sure you learn the theory behind it as well.
#16
An exhaustive method of learning the 12 Major Scales

If you practice your Major Scales like this, you'll know them so well that you'll be able to play out of position and you'll learn the neck of the guitar exceptionally well. And you can apply it to any other scale (even pentatonics) and you'll find you can play these scales out of position on demand, a necessity for soloing that spans any sort of distance.

Pick any range of about 5 frets on the guitar neck, for this example, let's use open strings up to the 4th fret. Now start with the key of C Major (Major Scales: all the scales are written out on the bottom of this page). What this scale practice method does for you is teaches you the full range of each scale at any point on the guitar, instead of just learning them root to root. So in C Major the lowest pitch you can play in our selected fret range is E natural, or Open low E. So you start with this and work your way up the scale using only up to the 4th fret (there is no need to shift up to the 5th). The highest pitch you'll be able to play is the high G on the high E string. Play up to this G, then go back down. SAY EACH PITCH AS YOU PLAY IT, otherwise this becomes a mechanical pattern memorization exercise, and that is not our aim, our aim is for you to know what notes are in each scale, and for you to see on the fretboard where those notes are. After you've got your C scale fairly well down (don't go for perfection if you're having trouble, you're gonna be practicing scales your whole life, so don't stress over it) go around the circle of 4ths/5ths and do each scale in this same position.

Once you've got this position down, move up a couple of frets, like to the 2/3rd frets. Once you stop using open strings there will be situations where you need to slide up or down 1 fret for certain scales, so don't feel bad. Just repeat the process for each position and say the name of each note as you play it.

You can apply this same practice method to ANY scale. This is the method I learned at my old university, and it is phenomenal if you're serious about really learning your scales and the fretboard.
#17
Praticing questions and answer phrasing had help greatly.
My solo or improve makes more sence rather then just random
riffs or scales.


I'm actaully learning to use the Neutral Pentatonic at the moment.
Even thou it has the same notes as the maj/mar pentatonic.
It sounds different.

I've always done this anyway...but after learning the Blues scale
which has only a b5 inserted. I stopped playing the 7th (option note).
...if you add the 7th back...it's just call Blues veriation 1.lol

Also the bebop scales. The bebop scales has option notes
sort of speak.
#19
me niether..that's why i'm trying it out.lol

I notice..lets say if the parent scale is C, over the II, V,VI.., it won't play #or b

You can see it on that first pentatonic pattern that everybody learn.
If you start from the D (A string 5th fret) instead of the A or C.

songs such as Blackdog or The Ocean..actaully makes for sence to me now.lol
Last edited by Ordinary at May 19, 2008,
#20
i highly recommend learning the major scale (because its the basis of absolutely everything in western music) you can pick any pattern with any root and if you know that the formula is WWHWWWH you should try to construct the scale anyway which you feel is most comfortable. Then i would say to move on the basic arpeggios. And after you get a some-what firm grip on the basic major/minor scales and arpeggios, begin to expand them all over the neck.