#1
i have an old throwaway squire and i want to scallop the fret, are there any specs on how deep to go and what are they?
#5
I can't give you any information on how to do it, but I'm pretty sure this is wrong:
#6
get a round file and be prepared to be patient. i did this to a epiphone les paul a few years ago. it turned out pretty well. start from the center of the fret and work your way out. i no longer have the guitar so i cant really show you any pictures but i cant stress enough be patient
#7
Quote by commiejay
get a round file and be prepared to be patient. i did this to a epiphone les paul a few years ago. it turned out pretty well. start from the center of the fret and work your way out. i no longer have the guitar so i cant really show you any pictures but i cant stress enough be patient


Or, if you have real balls, try a dremel with a sanding attachment. Perry Ormsby does his with sandpaper around a drillbit, on an electric drill.
#8
Quote by kyrreca
I can't give you any information on how to do it, but I'm pretty sure this is wrong:


What the hell happened to that?!

Quote by -MintSauce-
Or, if you have real balls, try a dremel with a sanding attachment. Perry Ormsby does his with sandpaper around a drillbit, on an electric drill.


Not balls, just a steady hand and eye.

The advice I give everyone is to go with a VERY shallow scallop. You don't really need to go very deep to get a great feel, lots of people just go way too deep, and they don't like the scallop at all.
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#9
try the 12 fret up and see if you like it
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#10
Quote by AngusX
The advice I give everyone is to go with a VERY shallow scallop. You don't really need to go very deep to get a great feel, lots of people just go way too deep, and they don't like the scallop at all.

DEFINITELY agree with that. Well-scallopped fretboards are great IMO but if you go too deep, not only will it often look like hell, but the neck will become far too flexible, meaning you'll have to tighten the truss a lot and last time that happened to me, the truss wouldn't tighten that far. Bummer . . .

You're just trying to deepen the gaps a little, not make it look like a washboard.
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#11
Quote by even_flow
DEFINITELY agree with that. Well-scallopped fretboards are great IMO but if you go too deep, not only will it often look like hell, but the neck will become far too flexible, meaning you'll have to tighten the truss a lot and last time that happened to me, the truss wouldn't tighten that far. Bummer . . .

You're just trying to deepen the gaps a little, not make it look like a washboard.


+1

It's better to scallop too little, then go deeper.

Also, most people go for frets 20-24.
#12
Quote by kyrreca
I can't give you any information on how to do it, but I'm pretty sure this is wrong:



Oh god

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#13
If you're more visually inclined, project guitar has several tutorials. I'd recommend doing only the upper frets first and seeing if you like it. I did the upper 5 on one of mine a while back, it's pretty nice but I'd hate to have a fully scalloped neck. If you're doing it by hand expect anywhere from 30-40 minutes per fret.
#14
Quote by guitar/bass76
If you're more visually inclined, project guitar has several tutorials. I'd recommend doing only the upper frets first and seeing if you like it. I did the upper 5 on one of mine a while back, it's pretty nice but I'd hate to have a fully scalloped neck. If you're doing it by hand expect anywhere from 30-40 minutes per fret.


30-40 per fret?! It took me 3 hours to do my entire neck, from pulling it off of my guitar to spraying a new coat of lacquer. Proper tools make a world of difference, too. I did mine with one piece of sandpaper and a square file, simply because I was too lazy to get the right stuff to do the job.

I recommend going a little further than just the top 4 frets, you really don't get the feel of a scalloped fretboard with just the top 4. Honestly, I prefer my full scallop over a partial. Playing anything does not become any more difficult; unless you play guitar like you are on steroids. It takes all of 15 minutes to get used to, at least it did me, and you'll love the feel, most likely.

If you can find one, find a crappy neck for cheap, and scallop it, see how you like the feel. FYI, nobody that's played my scalloped neck had any problems, and they all liked the feel.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#15
Quote by AngusX
30-40 per fret?! It took me 3 hours to do my entire neck, from pulling it off of my guitar to spraying a new coat of lacquer. Proper tools make a world of difference, too. I did mine with one piece of sandpaper and a square file, simply because I was too lazy to get the right stuff to do the job.

I recommend going a little further than just the top 4 frets, you really don't get the feel of a scalloped fretboard with just the top 4. Honestly, I prefer my full scallop over a partial. Playing anything does not become any more difficult; unless you play guitar like you are on steroids. It takes all of 15 minutes to get used to, at least it did me, and you'll love the feel, most likely.

If you can find one, find a crappy neck for cheap, and scallop it, see how you like the feel. FYI, nobody that's played my scalloped neck had any problems, and they all liked the feel.



Hey man, I'm thinking of scalloping my strat neck, I was just wondering, do you feel it's more difficult to do chords at the top frets with scalloping, or is it almost the same?

Thanks
Follower of Zeppelinism

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#16
harder
jackson dk2 2008
hamer xt sunburst qt
epiphone g400
peavey vk212
morley p wah
behringer pb1000
dige bm
big muff ny
behringer dc 9 comp
member of the Jackson/Charvel Owners Club

£8.50/58fund for a ROCKTRON HUSH SUPER C PEDAL
#17
Quote by QueenZeppelin
Hey man, I'm thinking of scalloping my strat neck, I was just wondering, do you feel it's more difficult to do chords at the top frets with scalloping, or is it almost the same?

Thanks


I think it's almost the same, a bit more difficult, but nothing really dramatic. I don't notice a difference until I try to chord above the 12th fret, and I rarely do that. Like I said, a few minutes of getting used to it, and you won't really notice. I think playing some chords is actually easier because you don't need to apply as much force to sound the notes. That's just me, though.

There's so much negative stigma about scalloped necks, you know, stuff like "you can't play chords," or, "you can't play aggressively or the notes will be sharp," or, "the neck will bend like crazy and you won't stay in tune." Basically, they aren't really true, I think part of it is just from bad experiences from a poor scallop, and part of it is just ignorance.
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