#1
I'm starting to get serious about my sound, besides thinking about building a "guitar fort" so I can record any reasonable time, crank it, and not have to worry about pissing anyone off. I've been listening to a lot of guitar recordings of mine, and as well as others, and then listening to professional bands, they just sound so much fuller and clearer. How does one get close(r) to the sound of a guitar sound from a studio without actually having to go to one. I know mic placement is huge, I myself am still perfecting that. But the tools they use, like (I know, huge ass EQ boards), compressers, and what not.

Is anybody familiar with how to 'get that sound'or get closer to it? Aside from them being professionals with top of the line equipment.

Thanks
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Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
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ENGL E212VH Cab

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Epi Explorer
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Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#2
its all in the mastering and mixing, uve mentioned EQ and Compressors they are huge when it comes to recording and u will find that it will make ur sound heaps better louder and clearer
then there are the other part of mixing and mastering and it all helps with sound and clarity
#3
Well, I use a Line6 guitarport, which, according to Line6, has been used by a few big name bands on professional recordings. For me, it works great, and really does get that sound your talking about (with a bit of compression and light reverb of course). I don't know if you're up for going into the digital tone realm, but if you are, it's definitely cheaper than expensive mics, a variety of amps, pedals, etc. and for me produces some great results. I think I picked mine up for $100-$120.
#4
Well I have a Line6 GuitarPort, I like the sound I can make out of the stock amps/effects. But I think the nothing sounds as good as an actual amp mic'd. IMO. But I do love the GuitarPort to just plug in and play late at night.
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#5
Mic placement. Room treatment. Where your amp is in the room affects it. Good preamps, good converters, a little compression, you can find free VST compressor plug ins googling free compression or free compressors, experiment with that and see how it changes sound, experiment with a little bit of reverb, eq, etc. Try dual micing, panning, and

DOUBLE TRACKING.
#6
record yourself playing the riff. then record it again. then put one all the way to the left and one all the way to the right. that helps thicken up the sound.

also, id find erock on here. his recordings sound amazing.

edit: http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Erock503/
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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Last edited by InanezGuitars44 at May 6, 2008,
#7
Nice mics, nice interfaces/preamps, good jobs mixing and mastering
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Ernie Ball Music Man Silhouette Special
Washburn WI64
Martin D-15
Amps
1960s Harmony
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Rivera Chubster 55
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Fulltone OCD v.1
Keeley TS808
Voodoo Labs Superfuzz
Wilson WH10
Boss DD-20
#8
Oh I know about double tracking, and wide panning and what not, I've recorded decent stuff, I'm just trying to improve my sound further more. Thanks for all the help, really, I appreciate it everyone.
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
#9
Quote by InanezGuitars44
record yourself playing the riff. then record it again. then put one all the way to the left and one all the way to the right. that helps thicken up the sound.

also, id find erock on here. his recordings sound amazing.

edit: http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Erock503/

hey thanks man, appreciate that, but my stuff is pretty raw. I don't do any mastering or post EQ on my stuff, just double tracking. I have a cheapo 4ch mixer, 2 good mics, and a GNX4 recorder, that's my whole setup. I'd like to learn mastering though, I've heard guys do some amazing stuff with even mediocre raw tracks.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
amp clips
amp vids
Last edited by Erock503 at May 6, 2008,
#11
You have to remember digital will never sound like analog.I have recorded in studios that use nothing but digital recorders but they always convert the signal back to analog. In the studios that use tape that is not necessary. Analog is headroom. Good luck
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#12
well with decent equiptment you can do it. but it helps to know how to master, which is an art.
one thing that helps alot, especially for heavy riffs, duplicate the guitar track. Slighly pan the first to the left, and hard pan the other to the right. then eq them differently. (i generally make the on eon the right more trebly.) you can even slighty put them out of time. you can also duplicate them more times. it really really thickens up the sound.
also, remember, you dont need as much distortion as you think.


and for a guitar fort, what i did once was i just built a huge ass box around my amp, and soundproofed the box instead of soundproofing the whole room.
#13
The better equipment helps for sure but it takes time to understand and learn how to get the sound.

Good mic(s), EQ, compression, reverb, some delay, not using all the FX you have on hand...(dont overdo it...)

Then when you mix and master that will greatly change the overall sound as well.

If you want great sound in a home studio you are going to have to get some good mics, an interface, and a good sequencer software such as Cakewalk Sonar and then learn to use it all. You cant rush the process, it just happens...


You'll never get as close as a standard high end studio, they were build from the ground up to work with sound. Everything from the wiring/gear to the acoustic treatment.
Last edited by moody07747 at May 7, 2008,
#14
another thing about the line6 stuff mainly when people are using line6 products, they'll attach that fact to as many of their products as possible making it sort of a half truth.

i'm willing to bet any studio worth their salt doesn't use tone ports.

(although some may use pods.. not direct but thru a tube amp and then mic it)
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#15
when it comes to recording electric guitars i think only really takes a simple setup they are, a decent amp you can get your sounds out of and a decent interface. I use a Vox AD50VT and a tapco usb interface and record on reaper. I think i can some very decent recordings that way have a look in my profile to here it.
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#16
Quote by StillSoundRG

Is anybody familiar with how to 'get that sound'or get closer to it? Aside from them being professionals with top of the line equipment.

It really comes down to eq and enhancing harmonics which should be done analog, before the input of your digital recorder.

The sansamp is an all in one box. It's really the cheapest analog guitar eq/enhancer around. Try it. $200.

The next step up is a cabinet emulator like the Palmer PGA-04 and a tube preamp like The ART Gold MPA, or add $100 and get the Digital MPA, which is a Gold MPA with killer A/D converters. $850

The next step up is toying with mics and preamps and compressors. Micing clean fender amps is easy. Micing marshall and distortion amps is frankly a pita. Starts at $300 with a SM57 and a Art Tube pre or a dbx.

From here, there are dozens of tips, gear combinations, mojo recipes that I can hint at if you can already give some feedback.