#4
Quote by Martindecorum
Fugure, is a song with different sections (voices)

Toccata is a piano song



I read that Toccata was a technical composition, something meant to test the performer's endurance.
#5
Here's my definitions from lecture notes:

Fugue: A composition of 2-5 parts played or sung which begins with a presentation of a subject in imitation
in each part, continues with modulating passages of free counterpoint and further appearances of the subject, and ends with a strong affirmation of the tonic key.
Fugue terminology:
- Subject: primary musical idea
- Exposition
o Opening section of fugue
o Each voice presents the subject
- Episode

Toccata: An intrumental piece for keyboard or other instruments, requiring great technical dexterity.

Cannon: Lots of them, wiki lol.
#6
A toccata is a keyboard piece in improvisatory style. I always thought of them as long cadenzas. But that's not very simple, so I'd stick with Google.
#8
True, true. It gets confusing with certain examples, too. Like the famous Bach Toccata (in D?) which actually switches between toccata sections and fugal sections.

Oh, that crazy Bach. He probably improvised the whole thing and just wrote it down later.
#9
Quote by itsjustcheeze
Oh, that crazy Bach. He probably improvised the whole thing and just wrote it down later.
Funny story about Bach. You're probably right.

For those that don't know... I don't remember details, but Bach was scheduled to have a competition with another (much more famous) composer, until the guy skipped town because a spy he sent to Bach's church reported that he was improvising fugues.

Anyway, a toccata's really easy... it's just a piece that's really technical, intended as a piece for the performer to show off on.

Fugue, proper, is a counterpoint work, where the subject appears in each contrapuntal voice, answered by the same general ideas (responses), which are allowed to move freely -- it's actually easier to see that in music than it is to explain.

Canon is similar to fugue in form, except the counterpoint is strict imitation of the subject.
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
#12
Quote by Corwinoid
Anyway, a toccata's really easy... it's just a piece that's really technical, intended as a piece for the performer to show off on.
So "Eruption" could be considered a Toccata in Ab Minor?
#13
You guys are all technically right about fugues, but in practice its a song that takes a melody and variates it and starts throwing it in and starting the variations randomly and all over the place.
#14
Because you can't see/hear/understand the structure doesn't mean it's not there.
#17
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
It can be.

Shostakovich's 5th symphony/thread.


That's not what you said. You denied that there was any structure at all, which is ridiculous. Further, there is a difference between random and arbitrary.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
I'm incredibly familiar with Shostakovich, and I can't say I recall any fugal movements in it. There is an incredibly complex canon in the first movement; but there is no fugue.

Also, it's incredibly ironic that you picked that piece, since it's probably the defining antithesis of 'random' or 'de-structuralized' 20th century music.
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
#19
Quote by Corwinoid
I'm incredibly familiar with Shostakovich, and I can't say I recall any fugal movements in it. There is an incredibly complex canon in the first movement; but there is no fugue.

Also, it's incredibly ironic that you picked that piece, since it's probably the defining antithesis of 'random' or 'de-structuralized' 20th century music.


Sections could be defined as fugues, so for the sake of the argument Ill call the sections Im referring to as fugues. And while in reality fugues must be very organized and well thought out, they often give the feeling of chaos and disorganization.

EDIT: It also depends whos fugue your listening too. If your listening to the art of the fugue, things will be more organized and thought out. If your listening to something more contemporary and modern, not so much.
#20
I've found that the best way to see what a fugue is, is just listening to one, doesn't matter by who. As a recommendation, I like Leo Brouwer's(classical guitar composer from cuba) Fuga.