#1
I bought a guitar with EMG 81 and 85 pickups like 6 or 7 months ago. The guy at the store said the battery life was like 4-6 months, but i think ive passed that.

Are there any signs that the battery is close to dying? Or should i just change it every 6 or so
#3
Well the life is going to depend on how much you play it. I haven't had to change mine yet, but I'm sure you'll be able to hear when the battery is going.
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#4
You'd know if the batteries died on your EMGs... The sound would be completely different.
#5
Mine went out a couple weeks ago and the volume just slowly faded out...You'll know when it happens
#6
You notice it by the output. Whenn your battery is low, you will have less output.
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#7
Normally it is said as 2500 hours but does it hurt to change batteries? just change them every 2 months
#8
the harmonics will die off first , then output , then volume.

totally wad blind.quardian said just change u're batteries every 2 mths.

lol it's just batteries how low can u go.
#9
Quote by blind.quardian
Normally it is said as 2500 hours but does it hurt to change batteries? just change them every 2 months

Isnt that a bit waste of energy/money?
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#10
Quote by BirdHouse

lol it's just batteries how low can u go.

Easy for you to say... 9V battery costs 10 buck each where I live.
#11
Normally every 6 months should be enough if you play a few hours a day.
I do have a spare battery which I only use when I play live and I replace it after the gig to practice. This way I'm sure it's a good one on stage.
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#12
Quote by Roads5
Are there any signs that the battery is close to dying? Or should i just change it every 6 or so


If you play on high distortion, especially with a crunchy-esque tone, you might notice the guitar starting to sound stale. Usually the change in tone is gradual.
#13
Quote by blind.quardian
Normally it is said as 2500 hours but does it hurt to change batteries? just change them every 2 months

I heard it was only 1,000 hours.
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#14
EMG documentation specifies that the batteries last 3000 hours. If you're replacing them every few months you're doing something wrong because if you played 24/7 you could use the same battery for 125 days.
#16
Quote by hminh87
Best just make sure the guitar is unplugged when not playing.


This is what I was going to say.

Very important, since the plug from your lead cable closes the EMG circuitry, therefore draining your battery like a bitch, without you even playing.
#17
Can someone explain to me what is the difference between emgs and regular pickups? What advantages/disadvantages there are in having them? i suppose you have to have your guitar extensively modified?
#18
Quote by b2spirita
Can someone explain to me what is the difference between emgs and regular pickups? What advantages/disadvantages there are in having them? i suppose you have to have your guitar extensively modified?


The advantage is EMG active pickups are made for metal.
The disadvantage is EMG active pickups are made for metal.
Eh...
#19
hehe... also about the battery life... really its just a stupid battery. if you can afford a fcking guitar with emgs 2 batteries every few months make problem??? lol
#20
You'll know when they're dead. Less output, your rhythm and treble will sound the same, and your clean channel will start overdriving and getting fuzzy.
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#21
I have a better idea: buy one or two (guitar-dependant) 9V rechargable batteries. Keep another one on standby. Then, when your batteries are drained, swap the battery out for the fresh one, pop the drained one on charge and bingo - 1,000 uses, 1 payment per battery.
Economical, huh?

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#22
Quote by quantum leap
I have a better idea: buy one or two (guitar-dependant) 9V rechargable batteries. Keep another one on standby. Then, when your batteries are drained, swap the battery out for the fresh one, pop the drained one on charge and bingo - 1,000 uses, 1 payment per battery.
Economical, huh?


Yeah... and after like 5 charges the capacity has gone so low that the next charge will be on the nearest weekend.
I've been having very bad rechargeable 9V batteries my entire life. Maybe it's just me.
#23
Quote by b2spirita
Can someone explain to me what is the difference between emgs and regular pickups? What advantages/disadvantages there are in having them? i suppose you have to have your guitar extensively modified?


Since no-one else seems inclined to answer a very reasonable question...

EMGs are active and have pots with a range 0 - 50kΩ. The low impedance output means that free oscillation of the amp's input is damped; that means less noise.

For the same reason, and by virtue of the fact that the preamp is housed inside the pickup casing which is screened internally, there is very little inductive noise. This means that you can ditch the bridge earth connection which reduces considerably the risk of reverse potential electric shock.

Because they are internally amplified EMG's do not require a powerful magnetic core. This means less magnetic weighting and associated intonation problems.

Disadvantages are that you are battery dependent and there isn't the range of options offered by other manufacturers. You can't coil tap them, for example, and you can't fit them in the same guitar as a high impedance pickup a the pot values are all different.

Some people say they sound a bit clinical.
#24
Quote by LP_CL
Isnt that a bit waste of energy/money?


+1

i had the same battery in my hellraiser(ex-guitar) for 1 year and a bit and it was still goin strong.

edit: to the guy above me, there are coil tappable emg's e.g. the 89 model.
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#25
Quote by octavedoctor
Since no-one else seems inclined to answer a very reasonable question...

EMGs are active and have pots with a range 0 - 50kΩ. The low impedance output means that free oscillation of the amp's input is damped; that means less noise.

For the same reason, and by virtue of the fact that the preamp is housed inside the pickup casing which is screened internally, there is very little inductive noise. This means that you can ditch the bridge earth connection which reduces considerably the risk of reverse potential electric shock.

Because they are internally amplified EMG's do not require a powerful magnetic core. This means less magnetic weighting and associated intonation problems.

Disadvantages are that you are battery dependent and there isn't the range of options offered by other manufacturers. You can't coil tap them, for example, and you can't fit them in the same guitar as a high impedance pickup a the pot values are all different.

Some people say they sound a bit clinical.



They actually do offer coil tapping....81TW and 89...essentially an 81/85 set but with coil tapping capabilities