#1
I'm trying for the first time to write using an eastern scale. Using the scale for lead is simple enough, but I can't think of any chords that accompany it. Minor, Sus 4 and Sus 2 chords kinda fit, but don't quite seem right. The scale I'm using is 1 b2 3 4 5 b6.
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#2
You could always make chords using the scale itself, just by inventing combinations of notes from the scale that sound good. Or you could use implicit chords and just use 2 notes in the chords, thus making them in accordance as well as being a little more inventive.
#3
Please clarify what you mean by "eastern"
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#4
Quote by Corwinoid
Please clarify what you mean by "eastern"

"Eastern" may have been kind of vague. Generally what I have in mind is seen as being of a middle eastern origin. Basically dark, exotic sounding minor chords. If you try playing the scale, you'll have an idea of the sound I'm looking for.
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#5
Use the scale function in gp to help you see chords on the fretboard easier. Your progression can be arpeggios that are not neccesarily complete triads but still have progression or moving line in them. The example in gp is the most basic one i could think of. Also since there is no 7th in the scale your strongest point of resolution(at least to my ears) is the minor second, so it will probably sound better if you have b2-1 movement in your cadence.

Oh, watch out with Cmaj to Fmin as that would move the feel towards F minor because of the E to F movement(assuming the root is C). And one last thing use your bass note to "define" the chords ie C E G with E in the bass will feel more like Eminor with #5 than Cmaj.

Ps: Dont ask me y i was so compelled to help you, i have no idea.
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#6
psst.....that's phrygian dominant hexatonic! essentially the fifth mode of the harmonic scale without the seventh, or harmonic minor without the perfect fourth.
#7
The "eastern" music you are referring uses radically different conventions, and most likely doesn't make use of "chords", as you know them, at all.
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#8
archeo equals correct. they divide notes into semi-semitones which gives 26 different notes in an octave (correct me if i am wrong)
#9
Quote by sisuphi
archeo equals correct. they divide notes into semi-semitones which gives 26 different notes in an octave (correct me if i am wrong)

I believe it's only 24 notes in an octave.

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#10
If you mean things like arab music, or maybe indian, they don't have "chords" as we know them, they are very often homophonic. Melody is more important than harmony, and they have another style of intervals and harmony invented by some al guy (al faribi I think)
#11
I have a fretless bass. Is there a way for me discover/learn non-western musical systems?
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#12
Most Eastern music has a constant drone in the background (usually a tampura) so you are going to want to not stay far from the tonal center.
#13
Quote by ufossuck
The scale I'm using is 1 b2 3 4 5 b6.
Over that scale, only major scales will really fit *well*.

Alot of flamenco progressions (which is about as eastern as I can think of) will use progressions based around the aeolian mode. These progressions are called aeolian harmony's.

I regret to tell, T/S, that there are no magical chords that will sound eastern. Chord progressions, maybe.