#1
Hey all I've just joined the site and I recently began playing electric guitar (first guitar) that I bought for myself. I bought a starter package here http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Ibanez-RG7321-7String-Electric-Guitar?sku=518876

I am looking for advice on what I should learn right now. I've only been playing for a bit over 1 month now so obviously I am still a noob. I've just been going off of tabs and I've only learned a couple things that I can memorize : Crazy Train intro, and Metal gear Solid theme acoustic (lol)

I went to the website justinguitar.com and am doing the beginner course and doing the major D, A, and E chords. I don't know whats most important to learn at this stage though

The music I'm hoping to be able to play eventually is metal. thrash, death, prog, any of that style. I've been practicing 5+ hours a day the past few weeks and really want to progress.

Can I get some help?

-RaVe
#2
Learn the CAGED system matey, if you do a search on google you will find it.. and more importantly play songs you enjoy
#3
nice package..

lol.. u nid to learn all the chords first!

basics fisrties

den begin practicing power chords
#4
Thanks, and yeah the package is pretty good except I don't really like the amp at all..the gain (distortion, right?) sounds bad when up and gives all this nasty static so I'm looking to buy a new one soon.
#5
All Good Places To Start^^^

or you could start with your scales, penatonic or minor first
Guitars:
Gibson Les Paul Standard
Gibson Explorer New Century
Gibson RD Artist
Fender American Standard Telecaster

Amps:

Framus Cobra
Marshall JCM800 2203 - 1960A

Pedals:

Crybaby 535Q
Rockbox Boiling Point Overdrive
#6
Quote by Rave765
Thanks, and yeah the package is pretty good except I don't really like the amp at all..the gain (distortion, right?) sounds bad when up and gives all this nasty static so I'm looking to buy a new one soon.



Try practising clean first it will pay off later :x Beginning amps and package amps are almost always poor, but there good to start on. Once your deadset guitar is what you want to do then go and buy stuff, cuz lets be honest here its an addiction once your start buying :x

I think I started by learning the basic chords C, A, G, E and D and the Pentatonics, I'd warm my fingers up doing the pents and play some chords seemed to work ok for me :x
#8
^ That's funny because that's the amp I was looking at buying soon lol...


Thanks for the tips so far, where can I find a site to help me with the scales?
#11
Tips?
Don't give up. If at any stage it seems so hard it's not worth continuing, it is. Just practise, practise, practise!

DO NOT get a Line 6 or a Marshall MG.
For a beginner amp, you'd be much better off with a Roland Cube.
Line 6's sound terrible, and don't hold up well at all.

Learn your pentatonic scales and stuff, and whenever you hear a lick you like in a song, get a tab and learn that lick, so you can use it in your own solos/songs.

-Jayke
Member of the Laney Cult
#12
Quote by JaykeSucks
Tips?
DO NOT get a Line 6 or a Marshall MG.
For a beginner amp, you'd be much better off with a Roland Cube.
Line 6's sound terrible, and don't hold up well at all.

-Jayke



Pretty much I had a MG wasnt too bad when it worked... and from talking to the local shop he steered me away from spiders because of the same problems (and he sold the things) besides once you go valve I dont think you'd want either :P
Last edited by johntb at May 7, 2008,
#13
Quote by johntb
Pretty much I had a MG wasnt too bad when it worked... and from talking to the local shop he sterred me away from spiders because of the same problems (and he sold the things) besides once you go valve I dont think you'd want either :P



Heh, please do then link me a good worthwhile amp.
#15
Ok, I'm reading the CAGED system and I can understand it somewhat but I haven't learned all the major chords yet (only D, A, E) but does it just mean to play those chords on different frets in the pattern?
#16
Yeah, Get a different amp. The one you have now is probably going to give out in a few weeks.

Also, I wouldn't worry about theory until you can actually play and decide that you like guitar. It's a big waste of time learning theory, then getting bored and decide to quit.

Play some beginner songs first, have some fun with them.
#17
Quote by Ze_Metal
Yeah, Get a different amp. The one you have now is probably going to give out in a few weeks.

Also, I wouldn't worry about theory until you can actually play and decide that you like guitar. It's a big waste of time learning theory, then getting bored and decide to quit.

Play some beginner songs first, have some fun with them.



Yeah, the amp I have makes playing stuff with high gain unfun..I'm probly gonna just do this with a clean sound until I get a new one. Thanks so far guys
#18
Yeah, keep the gain low on that amp. My friend had one, didnt do anything to it and it just blew. The cable also broke at the ends.

Like someone mentioned, a roland cube is a good amp. Only $125 or so, good investment.
#19
Quote by Rave765
Ok, I'm reading the CAGED system and I can understand it somewhat but I haven't learned all the major chords yet (only D, A, E) but does it just mean to play those chords on different frets in the pattern?


Just concentrate learning them in the original position (open), the rest will come as and when needed i.e. once you know where your fingers go you can move it up and down the neck. Most importantly have some fun
Thinking about it Songs like Hey Joe have all them chords in a straightforward pattern

C, G, D, A, E. if you learn that you could prob have a bit of fun trying licks over the top?
#20
Forget scales for the time being, you don't need to worry about them yet and the worst thing you can do is spam your brain trying to learn too much stuff at once. Just concentrate on learning some chords for the time being, work on the basic open chords like E A and D then the fiddlier ones like C F and the dreaded B and F. Take it slowly, just look to learn a new chord every couple of days and hunt down songs that use them, you'll invariably stumble across songs with new chords so just learn them as you go and familarise yourself with chord construction so you know how to form chords as opposed to having to memorize every signle one.

Once you've got a good arsenal of open chords that you can change between smoothly and can bust out a few songs teach yourself barre chords. Easiest way to get the hang of them is to play songs you know, but replacing open chords with barres. Get yourself comfortable working with barre chords up and down the neck and switching between open and barre chords as and when required. That lot alone should take you a good few months...if it doesn't you're either a musical prodigy or you didn't learn them properly

By this point you should have decent finger strength and a decent sense of rhythm and timing so you can let yourself off the leash a bit...look into a few song tabs and work on some lead stuff - learn the basics of the major scale and the minor pentatonic too as this will help you follow the tabs for riffs and solos. There's a lot of techniques you'll stumble onto, like palm muting, hammer ons, bends etc, and the best thing to do is spend some practicing these techniques on their own before attempting to play a song that uses them. It might seem boring but it's a lot more helpful in the long run.
Actually called Mark!

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#21
Quote by steven seagull
Forget scales for the time being, you don't need to worry about them yet and the worst thing you can do is spam your brain trying to learn too much stuff at once. Just concentrate on learning some chords for the time being, work on the basic open chords like E A and D then the fiddlier ones like C F and the dreaded B and F. Take it slowly, just look to learn a new chord every couple of days and hunt down songs that use them, you'll invariably stumble across songs with new chords so just learn them as you go and familarise yourself with chord construction so you know how to form chords as opposed to having to memorize every signle one.

Once you've got a good arsenal of open chords that you can change between smoothly and can bust out a few songs teach yourself barre chords. Easiest way to get the hang of them is to play songs you know, but replacing open chords with barres. Get yourself comfortable working with barre chords up and down the neck and switching between open and barre chords as and when required. That lot alone should take you a good few months...if it doesn't you're either a musical prodigy or you didn't learn them properly

By this point you should have decent finger strength and a decent sense of rhythm and timing so you can let yourself off the leash a bit...look into a few song tabs and work on some lead stuff - learn the basics of the major scale and the minor pentatonic too as this will help you follow the tabs for riffs and solos. There's a lot of techniques you'll stumble onto, like palm muting, hammer ons, bends etc, and the best thing to do is spend some practicing these techniques on their own before attempting to play a song that uses them. It might seem boring but it's a lot more helpful in the long run.



Thanks alot man, I will do this.
#23
Easy way I learned is to master simple chords (C, D, E, Em, G, A) and learn songs which use these.
Learning scales and complex stuff can wait to when you take to it a bit more. Take a look at Bob Dylan songs as they are fairly simple and use C,D,G mostly.

I have a list of about 25 decent songs that can be played with the above open chords. Learn these then start to learn the Barre chords and the complicated ones once your fingers and technique start to develop.
#24
So I've been doing the open chords D, A, and E still.. I have no problem with the E but on the D and A I sometimes accidently mute the high e string. I have been trying to just strum the chords and switch through them. Is there any certain way I should be positioning my hand/fingers, I try to curl them but it's only my third finger that's stoppin me from playing it properly ( The D and A open chords)..

Also another thing...my guitar has "medium" frets, I don't know what that means but could someone tell me? I notice some guitars that I've looked at online have "jumbo" frets as well. Does that mean the space on the frets is wider? Lol I know it's a noob question but still..

Thanks,

Rave
Last edited by Rave765 at May 14, 2008,
#25
Jumbo medium etc is just the size of the fret wire, as for holding your chords practise and patience, use the tips of your fingers and play it slowly until your not muting eventually you will get it right.... If you position your thumb down the centre of the neck you should have more space to move your fingers, i.e standing them on there tips Ive probably explained that wrong im sure someone else could elaborate or give you a picture..

http://www.fretjam.com/how-to-hold-a-guitar.html although I dont really agree with some stuff on here (it was a quick google search) it has pictures
Last edited by johntb at May 15, 2008,