#1
Hi everyone, I'm 15 and I play guitar in a Metal band. I'm relatively new to guitar, (only been playing around 8 months) but I can see myself making progress. However, I found myself wondering about this today. Why do 98.9% of people my age who enjoy the same music I do, absolutely worship a simple barre chord? Such as:

E---
B---
G---
D--1
A--1
E--1


I mean, I enjoy the sound when it's in the right tuning, but its nothing special at all. Anyone can do it, and it's FAR from unique. Now, my band and I, we're all relatively close in experience level, which is good. In my opinion anyway. So, sometimes we write our own material. It's all crap, sure, but its nice to write some along with practicing covers. However, I noticed that, the other guitarist, absolutely rapes barre chords. EVERYTHING he plays is composed of the above chord, just in different places and moved around very quickly. The drummer worships him, and I admit, it sounds good, but... It's always practically the same sound. Becomes very redundant...

So, why do people substitute barre chords for guitar playing?
#2
Im not surprised you dont like them if you play them like the one you just mentioned. Remember to drop your E to a D if you wanna do it like that.

But i agree, they are overused, but can be good at the right times.
#3
thats not a barre chord, its a power chord when your using dropped tunings such as drop d and c etc
Quote by .arkness:.
I did it in the church confession booth. i jizzed all over the mesh in an attempt to hit the priest.
#4
Right, right. I was just jotting it down in standard tuning man. I only play barre's in Drop D, Drop C or Drop B. Those as well as Open G and Standard(of course) are the tunings I'm fond of.

EDIT: Ah... My mistake. *Power Chord*

EDIT2: Also... When I said the drummer "worships" the other guitarist. I was really understating it. If you were to talk to our drummer, you would think this guy could walk on water while playing the "Through the Fire and Flames" behind his back with one hand.
Last edited by CraZyB0y at May 7, 2008,
#5
Well, if you've been playing 8 months and
a) confuse power chords with barre chords
b) confuse standard tuning with drop D tuning
c) question the importance of power chords in metal,
I have doubts as to how much progress you've made. Metal riffs, like it or not, are largely based around power chords. Sure, you can't play a solo (or anything very interesting) using power chords, but for simple effective riffs they're excellent.
#8
Quote by CraZyB0y
Hi everyone, I'm 15 and I play guitar in a Metal band. I'm relatively new to guitar, (only been playing around 8 months) but I can see myself making progress. However, I found myself wondering about this today. Why do 98.9% of people my age who enjoy the same music I do, absolutely worship a simple barre chord? Such as:

E---
B---
G---
D--1
A--1
E--1


I mean, I enjoy the sound when it's in the right tuning, but its nothing special at all. Anyone can do it, and it's FAR from unique. Now, my band and I, we're all relatively close in experience level, which is good. In my opinion anyway. So, sometimes we write our own material. It's all crap, sure, but its nice to write some along with practicing covers. However, I noticed that, the other guitarist, absolutely rapes barre chords. EVERYTHING he plays is composed of the above chord, just in different places and moved around very quickly. The drummer worships him, and I admit, it sounds good, but... It's always practically the same sound. Becomes very redundant...

So, why do people substitute barre chords for guitar playing?



those are power chords.

why?? cause its easy, its very metal, and you can give the appearance of being awesome when what your doing is very easy.

really though. power chords have a certain sound. The sound full, powerful. They sound great with lots of distortion.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 7, 2008,
#9
^Yes, because there's no "predefined emotion" in a power chord, it's just a root and a 5th, no 3rd. The 3rd defines whether it's major or minor.

1.When improvising, the guitarist has a choice to make it major or minor.
2.Sounds good with distortion due to less dissonance.
EDIT: actually, no dissonance.
#10
You can take any melody, power chord it, and endup with "teh brootelz." It's basically a way to make things heavy without having to really think more deeply about harmony. I'm in no way saying they're inferior to regular chords, but that's definitely part of the popularity behind them.
#11
you can go like this after a while .

-------------------7--------------
-------------------7---8---------
-------------------7--------------
-------------------7-------9------
-------------------7---------10--
-------------------7---------------

Basically just bar with your index finger
but make the chord as if it's open posistion
it's bascailly a bar C chord shuffle to the 7th fret. Which makes it a G.

Shift the pinky finger from the 10th fret A string to 9th fret G string.
and you 'll get Emin.

A quick way to find your key (root) and the relative minor

This will also open up the fretboard scales pattern as if it's open
posistion or at the 12 fret
Last edited by Ordinary at May 8, 2008,
#12
Interesting replies... I just find it a little redundant to use those power chords over and over. One of the songs my band is covering is "Before I Forget" by Slipknot. This song is personal favorite of mine, but its mostly those simple power chords like the one my example above.

Oh well, answers my question. Thanks, UGers.
#13
Instead of playing the root and the 5th.

Try other combinations to get different tones, such as ....

root, b6
root, 5
root, b5
root,3rd
root,b3rd
#14
Because simple + speed = complex sounding.

It allows you to have up to 5 powerchords in one position instead of having to move your whole hand, because you can do them with one finger. People seem to have this notion that simple is boring... but ten simple things layered on top of each other can sound rather complex.

Plus, if you want really big sounding powershords, you can expand it from say, low to high 555xxx, to 55578x. You add another root and another fifth. This shape is not possible in standard, it'd be 35578x.