#1
I checked around for a topic like this one. While the information they offered was very helpful, I couldn't find another that matched my particular situation and needs.

I'm heading off to college soon, and I plan on bringing my guitars, both acoustic (for the ladies) and electric.

However, therein lies my dilemma: The only amp I own is a hulking tube amp from the 70s, and I lack the funds to purchase a new amp (being a college student).

I am only a casual player, playing for the love of playing, so I don't need any professional-grade equipment. It seems to me that the best solution to my problem is to purchase a guitar interface for my laptop, as it is (hopefully) much cheaper and much smaller than an amp. I already have guitar modeling software, so that is a non-issue, really.

My question is, which interface would be the closest fit for my particular needs? I've been checking out the Line 6 TonePort products, and they seem to be very well-rated and reasonably priced. To be honest, I don't see a huge difference between a few of them, so I'm interested to know the value of each upgrade.

But I'm more than willing to consider other brands if they offer a better value!

Thanks in advance, and sorry for the long post... I'm feeling talkative

P.S. Oh yeah, I'm going to own a Macbook Pro pretty soon, so I'd also like to know if that should affect any purchase I'm going to make. I'm almost positive all interfaces are Windows/Mac compatible, but I'd just like to make sure.
#2
I'd recommend searching for a second hand POD 2.0, I got one for about £50 and it's great. Just get a paid of headphones and you're all set.
- Epiphone Les Paul Black Beauty w/EMG 81 & EMG 85
- Ibanez S470 "Baby Blue"
- Jim Dunlop Zakk Wylde Wah Pedal
- Digitech Whammy Pedal
- POD 2.0
- Vox AD30VT
#3
What exactly would that offer over the TonePort?

I'm not huge on electric guitar equipment, obviously - I'm more of an acoustic man
#4
It is essentially a multieffects pedal. But it has a headphone jack so you just plug into that if you dont have an amp. Ideal for silent practice. Plus it has a bunch of amp models, presets and effects on there to mess around with. I havent used the Pod enough to give it my seal of approval, but I liked it enough for this type of situation.

I am just wrapping up my first year of college and before I brought my old behringer practice amp up I used my Digitech RP200a and did the same exact thing.
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
Dean Evo
Mesa F-50
Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
Ampeg V2
pedals
#5
Get a Toneport GX and a pair of full size headphones. I have a Toneport GX and a pair of Grado SR60 headphones. If you want to spend slightly less get a pair of Sennheiser HD 201.

And if you want to record yourself you can download Audacity for free online.
Last edited by metalman89 at May 7, 2008,
#6
The POD 2.0 seems like a cool option, as I would be able to run it through an amp if I felt the need later on down the line.

On the other hand, the TonePort GX is cheaper, smaller, and brand new...

I'm torn between the two, but I think I'm leaning slightly toward the GX. I already have access to Amplitube 2, so I don't know that I will actually need the modeling effects of the POD 2.0.

Would the quality of the modeling differ from the POD and Amplitube at all?
#7
I'd just go for the TonePort honestly. PODs can get pretty expensive, they're worth it as they'll sound better than the TonePort will with its software, but if you're not planning on using it anyway, it would probably be wiser, not to mention cheaper, to go with the GX.

As for the differences between the TonePorts, the UX1 has an input for a mic added and the UX2 has 2 mic inputs and 2 instrument inputs as well as phantom power for a condensor mic that needs it.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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