#2
^ well depending on what type of classical music you want to write you need to stick to the rules of it. since classical is pretty broad in spectrum i'd recommend doing some research. also apparently it must be played on a classical type instrument, no electrics.

now for classically STYLED music, thats a different story altogether. that would be music that is inherently classical in nature and influenced often heavily by classical music but not ACTUALLY classical music. and again, there is so much classical music its hard to say "this, this and this makes a song sound classical in nature"
#4
1. Take everything you've learned from rock, blues, metal, alternative, etc. and throw 90% of it out the window.
2. Learn theory, experiment with intervals, chord changes; develop you ear in general.
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#6
Quote by metal=god
my advice is: be a child prodegy or give up.

Crap advice.

There are a lot of rules and conventions in Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Nationalist (which are you looking to compose?), but the overriding priority in a good piece of classical music is melody.

Listen to a lot of the music you want to compose like, and get sheet music of it. Analyse the parts that you like, and look up forms like sonata and rondo to see how they are applied.

Romantic music in particular is about imagination - a lot of Beethoven, for example, is based on an idea or scene such as Nature or a battle.
Quote by theacousticpunk
1. Take everything you've learned from rock, blues, metal, alternative, etc. and throw 90% of it out the window.

Also bad advice.

All Western music uses the same basic theory and techniques - the major scale, the circle of fifths, modes, triads and 7th chords etc - and generally similar rhythms and time signatures. You can learn ideas from blues and jazz and apply it to classical music, such as phrasing and use of chord voicings.

Applying modern sensibilities like metal sequences or reggae rhythms to your composing could also give you a more original style.

Listen to Karl Jenkins' music, eg Adiemus or the Requiem, to hear how he applies Welsh musical ideas to classical music; and have a look at modern classical music like Mike Oldfield's Music of the Spheres, and Steve Vai's Sound Theories.
Last edited by blue_strat at May 7, 2008,
#7
I'd say write a pretty involved classical-sounding melody, (since classical is heavily melody based), and then right different harmony or backup type parts that fit with the melody and chords.
#8
Okay, well I'll throw in a basic tip to harness that classical sound since the more advanced stuff has been covered:

Layering various melodies together with different sections will create that orchestral sound.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Wouldn't any kind of modern music written in the style of the classical composers be considered Neo-Classical?
No! Neo-classic refers to a very specific 20th century style of polyphony.

[quote="ninjafingers[/quote"]I'd say write a pretty involved classical-sounding melody, (since classical is heavily melody based), and then right different harmony or backup type parts that fit with the melody and chords.Of course, this is completely useful advice to someone asking how to write classical music, how? This is pretty damned circular... "How do I write classical music" "Classical music is melodically based, write a classical sounding melody." "How do I write a classical sounding melody?" "Uh..."

--
I'll assume you actually meant classical music, so...

Classical music is defined largely by its form, and expressions within that form. SA form, for instance, has the exposition, development, recap, and other sections that are put together to form a sonata. Writing classical music is pretty much about writing in these forms, with a mindset focused on classical style counterpoint and thematic development through fairly standard forms of alteration (retorgression, inversion, etc).

It's really hard to tell you how to write in a specific style, without having a much better idea of what style it is you want to be writing in, though.
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#11
Quote by Corwinoid
No! Neo-classic refers to a very specific 20th century style of polyphony.
Oh, I thought that was true. What would modern "classical" music be then? Is it New Age?