#1
Although useful and handy, the pentatonic scale os a scale u use when ur brain craps out on you. I use it
#5
the pentatonic scale standard box form is very easy to just sit there and jam on....however, by using the pentatonic scale and your brain, you can create amazing solos....just have to include multiple note scales........many of the best rock solos use the pentatonic scale...i would even say most
#6
Any box shape is a "crutchc" if you just run your fingers through it. If you're consciously thinking about what you're playing, you can get quite a bit out of five measly notes.
#7
no scale or scale shape is a crutch.

To say they are a crutch is to dissuade someone from using them because of your negative connotation. Thats bad because as artists we want to have all the colors available so we can choose whats best for our art. There is no reason to spread negative ideas about any scale, or the shape that the scale makes on the guitar neck. They are what they are. if someone uses them, or anything as a crutch, thats their own fault.

Some people treat theory as a crutch, others use fast licks as a crutch. Theory is good, fast licks are good.
#8
Quote by mater99
Although useful and handy, the pentatonic scale os a scale u use when ur brain craps out on you. I use it
Troll

Anyway, if T/S was being serious...
Pentatonics are just the most consonant set notes/intervals that can be used over a chord. If you use straight pentatonics, you will have virtually no dissonance/tension in your melodies, and be, IMO, boring. Pentatonics can be misused (IE pentatonic wanking) and they can be used properly (IE as something you shift into for some consonance).

The only notes more consonant than pentatonics are chord tones, except for some certain situations. Like playing a root note over a chord with a major seventh. If the root note being used is a semitone higher than the major seventh, you'll get some muddy sounding dissonance.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
Troll

Anyway, if T/S was being serious...
Pentatonics are just the most consonant set notes/intervals that can be used over a chord. If you use straight pentatonics, you will have virtually no dissonance/tension in your melodies, and be, IMO, boring. Pentatonics can be misused (IE pentatonic wanking) and they can be used properly (IE as something you shift into for some consonance).

The only notes more consonant than pentatonics are chord tones, except for some certain situations. Like playing a root note over a chord with a major seventh. If the root note being used is a semitone higher than the major seventh, you'll get some muddy sounding dissonance.

i will have to disagree. in blues and rock you often play a minor pentatonic over a major chord. it wouldnt sound as dissonant as playing a diotonic minor scale over the chord but its still not exactly consonant. but i think we have just heard it used this way so much that it seems to be the norm.

but i like to use the pentatonic as a base scale to add other tones onto. but a lot of my speed playing is pentatonic based. kinda like eric johson or joe bonamassa. i still might throw in some other notes if i see fit but a lot of it is straight pentatonic. it has power in it and is good for all types of music. and if you know how to use the scale you can make it sound interesting.
#10
Quote by GuitarMunky
no scale or scale shape is a crutch.

To say they are a crutch is to dissuade someone from using them because of your negative connotation. Thats bad because as artists we want to have all the colors available so we can choose whats best for our art. There is no reason to spread negative ideas about any scale, or the shape that the scale makes on the guitar neck. They are what they are. if someone uses them, or anything as a crutch, thats their own fault.

Some people treat theory as a crutch, others use fast licks as a crutch. Theory is good, fast licks are good.

I was going to post but now I have no need to as guitarmunky has hit it right on the money.