#1
Hey,

I'm sure this question is easily answerable, I feel stupid for asking it, but I couldn't really find anything that explained it clearly.

If I'm in the key of C major, would I best use the C minor pent or A minor pent?
G major - Emin pent or Gmin pent?

etc
#2
If you're playing over a blues in C, it's a good idea to use the C min pent. If it's not a blues in C, use C maj pent. If it's a song in A minor, use A min pent

Same for G etc
My name is Andy
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#4
Ok thanks mate, really appreciate it.

So basically I can use either depending on if I want it to sound bluesy or not?

Feel free to forget about this thread now.
#5
you can also use A minor in the key of C major right? since its the relative minor
As you say, they are relative scales ie they have the same notes. So you can play the notes from A minor over a peice in C, but the fact is that it is in C, so you are playing C major.

So basically I can use either depending on if I want it to sound bluesy or not?
Yeah. Keep in mind that it isn't the only way to sound bluesy though.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Quote by disillusia
you can also use A minor in the key of C major right? since its the relative minor


The notes CDEFGAB over a C major progression are C major, regardless of the order you play them in. You are not playing A minor.
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#8
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#9
Let me put it another way ..you can play the Amin chord in the key of C
in whatever progression you wanna play it.

When moving the VI (relative minor) chord to the I chord.
It's identify as the minor key.
That's oneway of doing it.

There's not really a best way, it's a matter of taste.
If you're playing 12bars ...you can use G7 as the I, C7 as IV, and D7 as V.
You can play Gmin penta over G7, Dmin over D7...so, on and so forth.
If Gmaj penta over G7 is what you want to do, you can do it.

Okay...now to the dominate chord or the V chord..and why the term
dominate is use. So...you ask stupid questions like I do..lol
WTF ... is it dominating ??lol

One reason is the V7 chord stays constant or the same over veriouse scales.
Such as the key of Cmaj, C Harmonic Minor, C Melodic Minor.

example....G7 is the V chord for all the different C keys listed above.
It acts as an axis in a sort of way.

If you get into mode/scale later...the samething happens.

C ionian, C dorian, C, phyrgian...ect.
Excluding the locrian....The G note remains as the 5th note on all these differnt
modes.
Last edited by Ordinary at May 30, 2008,
#10
The answer to your question depends completely on what sound are you trying to get. The only scales you really shouldn't play are ones with conflicting notes. Other than that it is your clay.
#11
Quote by Ordinary

Okay...now to the dominate chord or the V chord..and why the term
dominate is use. So...you ask stupid questions like I do..lol
WTF ... is it dominating ??l


It's called dominant because there's a major third and a minor seventh.
#12
Quote by silentdud
The answer to your question depends completely on what sound are you trying to get. The only scales you really shouldn't play are ones with conflicting notes. Other than that it is your clay.

Well, no, it doesn't. If your tonal center is C, you're playing C major and not A minor. In that case, the scale name does not change based on the sonic effect you're trying to achieve.
#13
As you probably know, A minor pentatonic and C major pentatonic contain the same notes. However, they serve different functions in relation to their roots. Thus, if you play from that pool of notes(C D E G A) over a progression that is in C major, the notes have their C major key functions which means even if you think you're playing A minor pentatonic, you are in fact playing C major.
#14
Quote by :-D
Well, no, it doesn't. If your tonal center is C, you're playing C major and not A minor. In that case, the scale name does not change based on the sonic effect you're trying to achieve.
I tink mr T/S means is using the notes from the scales he mentioned.

Quote by disillusia
you can also use A minor in the key of C major right? since its the relative minor
Yes and no. Yes because you can use the notes from that scale and sound relatively consonant. No because it would be functioning as a C major scale. The scale and mode you use is dependant on the chords underneath, NOT what shape you use.

Quote by Marsbe
Hey,

I'm sure this question is easily answerable, I feel stupid for asking it, but I couldn't really find anything that explained it clearly.

If I'm in the key of C major, would I best use the C minor pent or A minor pent?
G major - Emin pent or Gmin pent?

etc
It depends on what chords and chord progressions are used underneath. If you use c minor over a C's dominant chord (G7), it will sound eastern due to the b6 the scale would make with the G7.

I like to make sure what ever I play is best fitted to sound like I want it to sound over each chord.
#15
Quote by :-D
Well, no, it doesn't. If your tonal center is C, you're playing C major and not A minor. In that case, the scale name does not change based on the sonic effect you're trying to achieve.


You obviously didn't understand or read what I said because that has nothing to do with my post. reread.
#16
This is his question:
Quote by Marsbe
I'm sure this question is easily answerable, I feel stupid for asking it, but I couldn't really find anything that explained it clearly.

If I'm in the key of C major, would I best use the C minor pent or A minor pent?
G major - Emin pent or Gmin pent?

etc

This is your response:
Quote by silentdud
The answer to your question depends completely on what sound are you trying to get. The only scales you really shouldn't play are ones with conflicting notes. Other than that it is your clay.

You said "the answer to your question", which was the C/A question. Then you said it depends on what sound you want. However, that's wrong; if your tonal center is C, you're playing C major and your use of the scale is what determines the effect.

So you implied that what you said would be the answer to his original question. It's not.