#1
I have a question about how to do this. I know when playing with a jam track or something similar, you should use a scale depending on the chord progression, and the notes you play should also be the notes in the chords. I don't know how to do this yet, but at least I understand the concept, I think.

However, what about when playing just alone, with no music in the background. I figure you can just play any scale you want, but when just messing around with my guitar, I just kind of randomly go from note to note, sometimes play two strings at the same time, but the point is, i just kind of incoherently hit some notes, and sure, they might sound all right together, because they are all in the same key, but that is it. So first question, is there some structure to doing this? am i doing it right by just doing random notes, sliding around, bending and adding some vibrato in here or there? also, when people improvise, they never just play one note at a time, how do you know what notes sound good together? when they stop picking a single string, are they playing some form of a chord in that scale? thank you.
#2
Your brain doesn't just take the notes one at a time, but finds patterns in them. You could play a phrase, then nothing for a minute, and play the root note of the scale and it will sound right because your brain has remembered the key that you're in. It's all to do with simple harmonic intervals between the various frequencies, something that I don't know much about.
#3
I would call that noodling rather than improvising. Has its uses, you can find some really cool ideas that way, but it won't help you when you step up to take a solo in a band. Try and use a jam track, or make your own with garage band or something. Alternatively, you can try playing he bassline along with your solo. Its tricky but it'll sound more like a piece of music.
#4
yeah, thats the thing, when i noodle, i dont really know what im doing, im not really paying attention to the notes i play or anything, and it sounds all right when i do it above a jam track or something like that, but when i am just listening to myself, with nothing in teh background, its not very satisfying. i know it takes time and practice, but is there anything else to it? basically, i stop at picking single notes, but i want to move on to be able to do more than just play a sequence of individual notes, how do i know what notes sound good when played at the same time?
#5
Quote by nikeshp
yeah, thats the thing, when i noodle, i dont really know what im doing, im not really paying attention to the notes i play or anything, and it sounds all right when i do it above a jam track or something like that, but when i am just listening to myself, with nothing in teh background, its not very satisfying. i know it takes time and practice, but is there anything else to it? basically, i stop at picking single notes, but i want to move on to be able to do more than just play a sequence of individual notes, how do i know what notes sound good when played at the same time?

I'd say its all personal preference. Once you start figuring out the fretboard, where the notes are, how they complement (or don't complement) each other, you'll start to know what you want to know. Some musicians like exotic sounding solo's (Marty Friedman), others are really keen of chromatics (Dimebag).
#6
so its not enough to know that the notes in one scale complement each other?