#1
My apologies in advance if this subject has already been answered/discussed elsewhere.


Hey, guys and girls. I'm pretty new to this forum, but not to the one thing that I'm sure we all love and enjoy; the guitar. I've been playing for about ten years, and have always revolved my riffage, my lickage, and my overall playing around the blues. As such, I seem -- maybe it's all in my head -- to be stuck in the pentatonic box. I post this in hopes that one (or all) of you can give me some advice on how to break OUT of aforementioned box.

Any help would and will be greatly appreciated! Thanks...

--Hec
#3
Learn major, minor and possibly some blues scales if you play that sort of stuff.

Use these scales when creating riffs. I can see how it might be hard to get out of the pentatonic scale if you've been playing that long using it.

Also, scales (including pentatonic ones) are all over the fret board not just in one box shape. Try learning more than one postition for the above scales then joining these positions together.

Learning the notes on the fretboard would make it much easier to see scales all over the neck.

If fact maybe just learn some theory as well...
#4
Quote by xhriverax
My apologies in advance if this subject has already been answered/discussed elsewhere.


Hey, guys and girls. I'm pretty new to this forum, but not to the one thing that I'm sure we all love and enjoy; the guitar. I've been playing for about ten years, and have always revolved my riffage, my lickage, and my overall playing around the blues. As such, I seem -- maybe it's all in my head -- to be stuck in the pentatonic box. I post this in hopes that one (or all) of you can give me some advice on how to break OUT of aforementioned box.

Any help would and will be greatly appreciated! Thanks...

--Hec


Go here http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=modes&w=lessons
#5
Quote by xhriverax
My apologies in advance if this subject has already been answered/discussed elsewhere.


Hey, guys and girls. I'm pretty new to this forum, but not to the one thing that I'm sure we all love and enjoy; the guitar. I've been playing for about ten years, and have always revolved my riffage, my lickage, and my overall playing around the blues. As such, I seem -- maybe it's all in my head -- to be stuck in the pentatonic box. I post this in hopes that one (or all) of you can give me some advice on how to break OUT of aforementioned box.

Any help would and will be greatly appreciated! Thanks...

--Hec


simple:

learn some new scales
learn some new music (try something other than blues)
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
simple:

learn some new scales
learn some new music (try something other than blues)


I play much more than just the blues, thanks. It's just that what I play and the technique I use is based on the blues. That doesn't mean that's all I listen to or play.
#7
Quote by xhriverax
I play much more than just the blues, thanks. It's just that what I play and the technique I use is based on the blues. That doesn't mean that's all I listen to or play.

well try using the pentatonic scale as a base scale and add notes to it from different modes to add different feelings. thats usually what i do. also, you could try just thinking of the pentatonic in a different way. listen to eric johnson. he plays a lot of pentatonic stuff and some basic diotonic stuff. but he puts it together in a more interesting way than most people do.

i hope you know all the shapes too. if not, learn how to connect them all together and play through them. the problem usually is that people stick to the main box shape and play standard licks. but once you can use all the shapes and play all around the neck and not use standard blues/rock licks, you can make it sound like a new scale.
#8
Quote by EdawMail
you've been playing for 10 years and still haven't broken out?

your either lying, lazy or very hard of learning

You can shut the hell up now.

TS: Make sure you know the actual scales as opposed to just the fingerings. Learn the major scale first, go to the minor scale and then you can work with modes and some more exotic scales. Learning some music theory will help with all of this and can enable you to take your guitar playing to the next level. I'd recommend picking up a copy of The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory.

If you like pentatonics, I'd also suggest incorporating some wider intervallic jumps so that the playing doesn't really sound scalar. Listen to Eric Johnson's solo in "Manhattan" for an example of a basically pentatonic but highly styled and structured solo.
#9
Quote by xhriverax
I play much more than just the blues, thanks. It's just that what I play and the technique I use is based on the blues. That doesn't mean that's all I listen to or play.


Ok. Well the best advice I can give is to learn something new. I can't tell you what to learn. I would recommend finding something that is different than what your used to, and then see what its all about.

Also I wouldn't recommend re-inventing yourself by any means. Just give yourself some new colors to work with. Build on the foundation that you've already established.

Looking into theory as mentioned above can also give you some insight and more ideas. Just keep in mind with theory it takes a while as you 1st have to deal with the basics. If you have time for it though, I would highly recommend it.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 8, 2008,
#10
Quote by :-D
If you like pentatonics, I'd also suggest incorporating some wider intervallic jumps so that the playing doesn't really sound scalar. Listen to Eric Johnson's solo in "Manhattan" for an example of a basically pentatonic but highly styled and structured solo.


Yeah, while I recommend learnings your scales and their applications, you can also learn new ways to play the pentatonic. Larger intervals (4th, 5ths) can work well, and also substituting different pentatonic scales for one another (although you might want to learn some theory to get the basic ideas)

For instance, over an E minor chord, try mixing in some B minor pentatonic licks. B minor has almost all the notes from E minor pentatonic, but it has an F# instead of a G, so you'll be playing the 9th over Em instead of the 3rd.
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#12
Quote by psychodelia
Yeah, while I recommend learnings your scales and their applications, you can also learn new ways to play the pentatonic.
Definately. There's so much you can do with a pentatonic. You can spend years and years pushing it to it's limits. Pents sometimes get a bad rep in here(for good a bad reasons) but I say if you're so used to pentatonics, you could have a leg-up when you really experiment with it more.

But yeah...learn more scales, cause if anything, learning more scales taught me how to have more fun/creative options with adding craziness in between five tones.
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#13
Quote by psychodelia
Yeah, while I recommend learnings your scales and their applications, you can also learn new ways to play the pentatonic. Larger intervals (4th, 5ths) can work well, and also substituting different pentatonic scales for one another (although you might want to learn some theory to get the basic ideas)

For instance, over an E minor chord, try mixing in some B minor pentatonic licks. B minor has almost all the notes from E minor pentatonic, but it has an F# instead of a G, so you'll be playing the 9th over Em instead of the 3rd.


Yea, this is what changed the whole pentatonic thing for me. Personally I just tried to stop looking at it as this 'box' I was playing in and just focused on the notes. When I focus on the notes more I end up sliding around the neck more if I want a more legato feel, which takes me out of the 'box' in a quite literal way. And also just play the notes you want, a lot of them will lie within the pentatonic box and it is a good starting framework for your playing, but if you decide on a note outside, then so be it.

Also, I'm surely not amazing at just knowing how different notes are going to sound, but I know what the pentatonic scale looks like, and I know what key I am in, so you can kind of gauge how 'out' the notes will sound by seeing if you are staying within the pentatonic, within the key, or neither. And maybe try to get a feel for different notes outside the pentatonic scale, like the b5 "blue" note, or the maj6 in a minor pentatonic box which sounds almost "sweet" <-i dunno. Those are the obvious ones but you can always get a feel for the others.
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