#4
Not really, more certain frequencies an instrument should cover. Bass covers the lows and low-mids, drums cover the low mids and the mid...mids, and guitar covers mids and highs. Vocals usually just take over the highs when the guitar is playing rhythm.
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#5
Quote by locosenor13
rephrase your question, because it's hard to tell what you're asking



Like idk what volume we should put our rhythem and lead guitarists amp on and same with the bass. should it be as loud as the drums? where should the amps be put in the room? close or far apart? should they be near the singer? shouuld the drums be as far as possible?
#6
Not necessarily...it depends what kind of music you play/what kind of "mood" you want to create. However, the best advice (for any type of music) is to ensure that one instrument doesn't drowned out everything else.
I don't know why Mac users get so defensive when you call them idiots. I mean, Apple is a company that has built its entire user base around the fact that its users can't do simple things like turn their computers on.
#7
Quote by _synystergates_
Like idk what volume we should put our rhythem and lead guitarists amp on and same with the bass. should it be as loud as the drums? where should the amps be put in the room? close or far apart? should they be near the singer? shouuld the drums be as far as possible?

Dude, there's no correct way to do it, jsut try whatever, and change it around upntil it sounds good. But having everyone at about the same volume i susually a good place to start.
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