#1
Hi

What are the main differences between an acoustic guitar and a classical guitar??

thanks
#2
An acoustic guitar generally has a much bigger body and has steel strings. Also the neck joins the body at the 14th fret most of the time.

A classical guitar has a much smaller body, uses nylon strings and the neck usually joins the body at the 12th fret. The neck is also a lot wider.
#3
Quote by johnos
An acoustic guitar generally has a much bigger body and has steel strings. Also the neck joins the body at the 14th fret most of the time.

A classical guitar has a much smaller body, uses nylon strings and the neck usually joins the body at the 12th fret. The neck is also a lot wider.


+1
#4
What johnos said. They also sound different and different styles are used for each one.
#6
Well it depends on what your doing with it.

Sound:
This is a pretty hard thing to cover because of different guitars using different woods and different constructions. The advantages of your average (dreadnought with a spruce top, this would end up being an essay if I went over different wood combinations and body shapes/sizes so I'll keep it basic) steel string guitar is it has some extra volume, wont loose too much definition at louder volumes and can pretty much do everything. They will be brighter than a classical guitar.
A classical guitar is quieter than an acoustic and has a much more mellow sound too it. They tend to loose definition at higher volumes but they excel when it comes to fingerpicking. Personally, I really can't go by the sound of a nice classical guitar when it comes to fingerpicking. The complexity of the tone you can get out of a decent one is just amazing.

As for the other stuff. I find that Acoustic guitars help with my technique with playing electric alot because of the size and tension of the strings. If you can bend on an acoustic, you can bend on an electric. The same can't be said for a classical guitar. It used to take me a while to adjust to playing classical guitars (mainly because of the wider fretboard and because the strings would sometimes roll under my fingers) after i hadnt played them in a while. I got over that eventually though.
The biggest problem I had/have with classical guitars is I often play up on the higher frets and it's a lot harder to reach anything above 10 on a classical guitar. Thats just because of the style of music I play and it's not a problem for everyone.
Oh, and it always annoyed me restringing classical guitars as it takes a bit more skill to be able to do it properly (I don't own a classical guitar, so still haven't learnt how to do it well and quickly) and the strings take a long time to settle and become stable.

As you can probably see, I'm not a classical player. I love the sound of a classical guitar and love to just sit down on the couch and play one every once in a while (doesnt happen very often seeing as I don't own one though, lol).

If I can think of anything else I'll come back and post it. Also if your interested in learning more about body shapes and woods I can probably help to a certain extent with that. There are some good links around about tonewoods, have a look for "The Tonewoods Thread" (I think thats what its called) thats floating around here somewhere. As well as having a lot of stunning pictures of guitars, there are some good links on tonewoods that will be more useful than me at explaining. If your interested I'll also try to dig up some links on body shapes.
#7
Johnos has covered it pretty well. This question has been asked many times before though. Dont forget about the search function.
#8
just one other thing to add.... a classical guitar or a nylon string guitar IS an acoustic guitar. there are several different types of acoustic guitars. two of the most common are steel string (which is what most people just consider an acoustic guitar) and nylon string or classical.