#1
I've been playing for about 5 years. I've got the calluses and the whole deal. Recently though, the band's finally starting to get into some regular (and heavy) gigging, and we've begun to practice our 3-hour set almost daily. My left hand is fine (I've played guitar longer than bass), but my right hand striking fingers kill at the end of practice/a show.


Any tips?
#3
Kill as in blisters? There's nothing much you can do for blisters but play through them. I'm afraid if you take a break and then come back they're worse feeling. However, I find that a few minutes after playing and a few minutes into playing they tend to not hurt as much. Are they interfering with your ability to perform?
#4
Something I've noticed about blisters (not just on your fingertips, I row and get far too many blisters on my hands) is that they tend to 'peak' at their worst after about half an hour of not playing. I reckon keeping going through the pain is the best move if you're playing live, or in a practice session, because if you leave it a while they'll have had time to develop more and stiffen up, making them both hurt more and be more likely to burst. Which isn't good.

However, if you're practicing in your room or something, stop once your fingers start to really hurt. That way calluses will build up, without getting blisters.

If you're a guitarist, you should be able to use a pick, so in an emergency (or if you prefer the sound) switch to that occasionally, it'll save your fingers.
#5
Quote by Tallman
Stretch and warm up before.

Warm down after.

And make sure to drink plenty of fluids.

If your fingertips haven't developed blisters yet, that's good. That means that your callouses are hardcore enough that they're just getting phased, not owned. If it's possible to go a few days without playing, do that and let those things harden up even more.

If the band won't hear it, well... some people here have great advice on finger-wrapping and finger-soaking. I try my best to avoid having the necessity for these two things, so I won't be any help to you there. But somebody should be able to cure your ills.
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#7
No, no blisters. I've had my callouses for a while now, it's just now that the gigging has become heavy, they start to hurt after a while. We play 3 hour sets, so there's a considerable amount of music.

Anywho, the problem has seemed to go away for the most part. Thanks for those who replied.