#1
So, me and my 3 friends (2 guitarists and a drummer) are getting together on sunday to jam and play a couple of songs and I was wondering if anyone had any advice for me on playing with a drummer as i have never done it before.
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Last edited by lyndon_93 at May 9, 2008,
#2
the drummer keeps the time (at least they are supposed to). Follow the drummer for tempo but feel free to do whatever with your bass lines. If the guitar players aren't that great, don't go all willy nilly, they may loose their place.
Out here you've gotta know where your towel is!
#3
ull find it a lot easier than with no drummer, ull find that ull keep in time more and have a lot of fun

now if guys are just jamming and not playing actual songs
have someone start a riff and everyone else quickly learn that riff and then take it in turns improvising solos and what not.

The drummer should change the mood of the song from fast to slow to funky and all other things which everyone should mix well together
#4
thanks alot
the only song that I know we're definately playing is Chop Suey by SOAD.
thanks for the advice anyway.
Quote by HuckIt
I met this chick I really liked and wanted to practice sex, so I practiced on some guy


Quote by MetalheadforJC

I herd rap mean Retraded Attemped at Poetry

#5
The most basic step is to play on the bass drum beat. That's normally a reliable way to start locking in with the drums. You don't have to do it on every beat, or only play on the beat, but it provides a solid foundation.

Then get a feel for the rhythm the drummer's putting down. Is it fast? Slow? Are they emphasising certain parts of the drum beat? Try and add notes in (in key with the guitarist, obviously) that complement what the drummer's trying to do. So if they're putting down a simple rock beat, but emphasising every third beat, make that the focus of the bassline.

Remember, you're also the link between the guitars and the drums, so remember what the guitarists are doing. :P

It's easier than it sounds, and is awesome fun. Just go with the flow.

Or just work out a bass riff and let the drummer improvise along with you for a bit. That's the easy option.
#6
as long as the drummer can keep time you should be good to go....its like playing along with a cd
#8
Just a caution. You may experience unprecedented waves of euphoria. You might be overtaken by some foreign power that brings your playing from "good" to "Oh my God did he really just play that?!"

Some people can't handle this the first time they jam. So, make sure you are jamming along with the two guitarists the first time. Once you get used to the quality of your drummer and your compatibility with him, then you're ready to kick the two guitarists out of the building and tell them to go tell each other how much they love themselves. Now you can REALLY jam with the drummer.

...What?
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#9
Quote by WhyLater
Just a caution. You may experience unprecedented waves of euphoria. You might be overtaken by some foreign power that brings your playing from "good" to "Oh my God did he really just play that?!"



Lol, that is completely and utterly true. Locking with a drummer is like locking with the driving force of the musical universe-you become the invincible rhythm section from Valhalla.

But for real tips. 95% of the time or more, you will be playing a note when the drummer kicks the bass drum. Unless your drummer is really out there, the bass drum becomes the heartbeat of the beat. Lock on that beat and you can't go wrong. Also key in on the ride or hi-hat as well. Watch your drummer for physical cues; you'll know when he's going to run a fill or push the beat via body language. And when he goes off on a journey of John Bonhan intensity, that's normally your time to lay back and visa versa.

And if you can get some jam time with just you and the drummer, take advantage of it. Its a great way to cement the rhythm section and your own timing.

Have fun!
#10
Quote by anarkee
And if you can get some jam time with just you and the drummer, take advantage of it. Its a great way to cement the rhythm section and your own timing.
Yeah, that's what I said. Kick the guitarists out of the building. Preferably the county/parish.

Now, jokes aside, this is where it's important that you pay attention, because Anarkee made two very important points here. And did we expect any less?

First of all, body language. Definitely body language. Learning the body language of your drummer is like learning the body language of your significant other. Sure, there are some general constants that apply to most drummers/members of the opposite sex, and those are pretty easy to pick up on. But the longer you're with that drummer/relation, the longer you'll be able to tell exactly what he's thinking. Anarkee's got the advantage here, because for her, those two persons are one and the same.

Secondly, intensity balance. What's the reason everybody wants to be a guitarist nowadays? That's right - the attention. The guitarist gets the melodies, the solos, the limelight. The rest of us are, of course, inherently better people for not being guitarists. However, there's still that part of us that's human and wants attention. We want a fill here and there, maybe a solo if we're feeling crazy.

Now, here's how you need to look at it. You and the drummer? You're the rhythm section. So, four hour intense in porpoises hear*, you and the drummer are one instrument. Now, on any instrument, there's such thing as too much. There's a thin line to be crossed going from groovy and impressive into absolute noise. Since you and the drummer are one instrument, that means that the two of you must balance. If the drummer starts throwing in a fill that's unique throughout the song, you should react accordingly. One way is to play the same riff/root/whatever that is your constant throughout the song. Another way, once you get advanced enough, is to play a fill that is actually dumbed down. Think a bar of straight quarter notes, just for example. One way or the other, you should not both be rising too hard in intensity at the same time, or else it all becomes a waste of effort.

Thank you for reading my wall of text. I'm going to go try to write about 10 times that much on my final paper now. Good luck!


*"Four hour intense in porpoises"... you know I never really understood that expression.
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.
#11
Excellent thread guys. I am a noob bass player and am still waiting to get the first jam session in. Any other suggestions for the first time?
#12
Quote by Redsdawnmist
Excellent thread guys. I am a noob bass player and am still waiting to get the first jam session in. Any other suggestions for the first time?


if ur just jamming try heaps of different styles even styles u woouldnt necesarrily play by urself it just widends ur range in music and it actually still is quiet fun
#13
It was mentioned before, but usually whenever I go into solo or just do something different, the guitarists gets lost and just looks at me. And communicate with everyone, you can tell when there gunna change the beat.
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#14
look playing in live, i messed up because of the &%/&%$ drummer. The beat was really basic and he just changed it completely in the middle of the song.
I am a guitarist, but im in this forum cause i need to know some bass things.
Just tell your drummer that if he changes the rythm, all the band will get lost (but if the bass doesnt get lost, the whole band might go back again) try the drummer and the bass guitar player not to sing (unless you REALLY REALLY CAN CORDIATE)
___________________________________________________________________
Upward strokes are for loosers.
#15
Quote by actaderock
I am a guitarist, but im in this forum cause i need to know some bass things.
Thank you for clearing that up for us. I am sympathetic toward your inconvenience, having to come into THIS forum. Please see in my first post on a guitarist's place in a jam.

No... I'm a nice guy... I'm not really flaming you...

But really? Telling the bassist and drummer they can't sing? Is... isn't it legal obligation for me to call you an arrogant ass after that?

NOBODY who is not coordinated should be playing and singing at the same time. I guess in some genres, basslines are inherently more involved while the guitar parts are more rhythmic. So in that case, I'd see where you're coming from. But you don't strike me as a ska kind of guy. So I'm forced to guess that you're an elementary power chord kind of guy.

Basically... if you think it's automatically unfeasible for an bassist to sing as well as a guitarist, well... you're just ignorant.

But this is a gathering place of knowledge, so you're in luck! You're welcome!
Les Claypool
Geddy Lee
Robert DeLeo
Flea

Weileder

...Coincidence? I think not.