#1
Can you use a Power Attenuator (Marshall Power Brake) on a combo amp? The particular amp that I have in mind is the Peavey Classic 30
#2
You'll need an extension speaker cable, but I don't see why you wouldn't be able to use it. Just make sure its the same ohms.

Guitars:
-Jackson DXMG (SH-2N, SH-6)
-Schecter Hellraiser C1 (18v)
-Ibanez XPT707FX (Blackouts)
-Ibanez BTB 400 Bass

Main Amp: Mesa DR Roadster

#3
If you look at this picture you will see that there isn't a cord coming from the back of the amp and into the speaker. Anyway to do this?
#4
It can be done, but I would get a weber attenuator before I got a Marshall Powerbrake, TBH.
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#5
Hey, sorry to hijack the thread, but I don't want to start another one about this same thing...

I'm looking into an attenuator myself as my noise complaints are quickly becoming more numerous and frequent...

I've been looking into the Hot Plate and the Weber..

Do you guys have an opinion on which is better? I've searched these forums thoroughly and found out a great deal, but I've read bad and good about both, but typically the Hot Plate is getting better reviews on websites..

$329 versus around $200 is a pretty substantial difference..
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#6
Quote by johnhud
If you look at this picture you will see that there isn't a cord coming from the back of the amp and into the speaker. Anyway to do this?

Anything can be done if you know how! Follow the wires from the speaker. Hopefully there's enough wire there that you could just cut the speaker wires & solder in two
1/4" female jacks & run a speaker cable from the amp jack to the attenuator, & a second speaker cable from the attenuator to the speaker jack. If you don't use an attenuator, just use one speaker cable to connect the 2 jacks you just soldered in. It's really very simple. I could do it in probably less than 20 minutes.
Re: attenuators
I've used a THD Hot Plate for a long time, & it works very well in general. Better on some amps than others. One of my amps loses a lot of life w/ attenuation, the other one not nearly as much. I've not tried the Weber units, but have heard only great things.
The Hot Plate is a very versatile piece of gear, though, & is extremely well-designed. There's hi/lo boost switches & a variable line out also, which are very nice to have.
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#7
Quote by riffhog
Anything can be done if you know how! Follow the wires from the speaker. Hopefully there's enough wire there that you could just cut the speaker wires & solder in two
1/4" female jacks & run a speaker cable from the amp jack to the attenuator, & a second speaker cable from the attenuator to the speaker jack. If you don't use an attenuator, just use one speaker cable to connect the 2 jacks you just soldered in. It's really very simple. I could do it in probably less than 20 minutes.

This is true, but effectively mounting the two jacks to the back of the amp could require some hardware and modification to the amp cabinet. I'd recommend a little metal box to house the jacks be mounted to the inside wall of the amp cabinet. The metal box will help shield the connections.

If the wire from the amp to the speaker isn't long enough, disconnect it from the speaker, connect it to the "out" jack, then solder a new wire to the speaker's terminals and connect the other end to the "in" jack. There you will have terminals for the attenuator. If you want to bypass the attenuator, you'll have to use a short speaker cable to connect the "out" and "in" jacks together.
Last edited by carpepax at May 9, 2008,
#8
Quote by carpepax
This is true, but effectively mounting the two jacks to the back of the amp could require some hardware and modification to the amp cabinet. I'd recommend a little metal box to house the jacks be mounted to the inside wall of the amp cabinet. The metal box will help shield the connections.

If the wire from the amp to the speaker isn't long enough, disconnect it from the speaker, connect it to the "out" jack, then solder a new wire to the speaker's terminals and connect the other end to the "in" jack. There you will have terminals for the attenuator. If you want to bypass the attenuator, you'll have to use a short speaker cable to connect the "out" and "in" jacks together.


That would be the best suggestion, but use a plastic project box because the speakers would share a common ground with a conductive metal box.
Quote by thrilla13w
The hotbar should be floating parallel to the principle axis at this point. Next, take a hammer, and beat yourself in the face while crying JIHAD. problem fixed.

Quote by Slaytanic1993
cowdude speaks words of infinite wisdomery.
#9
Alright thanks guys for all your help. I will try doing this.

Thanks