#1
So I feel silly for asking, but I have this question about chord inversion.

Lets assume were playing a Cmaj. Obviously your first inversion is E G C and your second is blagh blagh blagh.

But lets say you have a Cdom7. So your first in version is is E G Bb C and your second is G Bb C E. But is it possible to have a theoretical third inversion voiced Bb C E G?
#2
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
So I feel silly for asking, but I have this question about chord inversion.

Lets assume were playing a Cmaj. Obviously your first inversion is E G C and your second is blagh blagh blagh.

But lets say you have a Cdom7. So your first in version is is E G Bb C and your second is G Bb C E. But is it possible to have a theoretical third inversion voiced Bb C E G?

Yes, "third inversion" is exactly what that would be called. It's actually quite a common term.
#3
Quote by :-D
Yes, "third inversion" is exactly what that would be called. It's actually quite a common term.


So does that apply to say a ninth chord too? Like a fourth inversion would be C D E G Bb and so on with other large chords?
#4
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
So does that apply to say a ninth chord too? Like a fourth inversion would be C D E G Bb and so on with other large chords?

If you wanted a fourth inversion (I've never heard the term), you'd put the ninth (D) at the bottom.
#5
^ actually try composing a piece entirely in 4th inversions , it will sound pretty out there. really cool, but very out there.
#6
Quote by z4twenny
^ actually try composing a piece entirely in 4th inversions , it will sound pretty out there. really cool, but very out there.

Have you done so? I'd be interested in hearing it if you have.
#7
Extended intervals don't invert. Period.

You can put them in the bass... but they're not inversions.
Quote by les_kris
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#9
Quote by :-D
Have you done so? I'd be interested in hearing it if you have.

i have a couple things i've messed around with, but i haven't recorded any of them.
#10
Quote by Corwinoid
Extended intervals don't invert. Period.

You can put them in the bass... but they're not inversions.

Really? In a lot of jazz work I've done/seen, the inversion the TS listed as "third inversion" has been called exactly that.
#11
I should have said compound intervals... 7ths invert... 9ths or larger don't.
Quote by les_kris
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#12
Quote by Corwinoid
I should have said compound intervals... 7ths invert... 9ths or larger don't.

Okay, thanks for clearing up - like I said earlier, I've never seen a so-called "fourth inversion" chord referenced as such.
#13
I should have said compound intervals... 7ths invert... 9ths or larger don't.
Why not?
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Quote by MudMartin
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#15
I guess a ninth would invert to a seventh.

What would you call a Cmaj9 chord with D in the bass? Something voiced like D G B C E

I guess you could call it G13 in second inversion
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#16
I'd call it "Cmaj9 with the 9th in the bass".... this really isn't even particularly fanciful. The question is more of whether nor not you understand the 9th, and why it goes in the bass.

Compound intervals don't invert because it doesn't really make sense, you kind of hit a brick wall where you can't reconcile the differences between certain things.

If a 9th inverts to a 7th, what inverts to a 9th? Inversions are reflexive, 2nds invert to 7ths, 7ths invert to 2nds. If a 9th inverts to a 7th, then the 9th is the same as a 2nd. Anybody even paying the most mild attention to what they're hearing will instantly tell you that's untrue.

This is, perhaps, most distinguished by the 11th. If compound intervals invert, the 11th inverts to a 5th. The 5th inverts to to a 4th. 11ths are the same as 4ths. Two things are immediately clear to the ear: They don't sound anything alike, and they don't even have the same function. (The 11th is exemplary, because the 4th of a chord has a very very strong tonal function, which is not there with the 11th).

This is, perhaps, why you almost never hear anybody talk about 13th chords in classical music... they're almost exclusively referred to as 7-6 chords. The 6th is strongly bound functionally, where the 13th would not be, and they almost always act in the frame of that functional binding.

Quote by bangoodcharlote
What do you call it? Would you have to call it a slash chord (ex C9/D)?
Completely missed you asking this, somehow. Yeah, that's what I'd tend towards. At least for lead sheets and the such. In formal analysis you would just omit the inversion altogether (it's immediately apparent where the 9th is).
Quote by les_kris
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Last edited by Corwinoid at May 10, 2008,
#17
Righto
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Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums