#1
If I was looking for a mystic/mystery sounding scale what scale would I use?

-Gulli05
#5
None of the above. No scale is going to sound "mystical" on its own.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
^ Well, yeah, it does depend on context and everything; but the TS can just play around with the scales and figure that out for himself.
#7
Quote by blue_strat
^ Well, yeah, it does depend on context and everything; but the TS can just play around with the scales and figure that out for himself.


+1

and the suggestions you guys gave are valid. You gave scales that you found to be mystic/mystery sounding. Thats alot more helpful than saying "none". At least the TS has 2 more scales to work with the might help him achieve the sound he's looking for.
#8
Keep in mind that the "mystical" sound depends so largely on the harmony that you can use any scale you want to achieve that kind of effect. However, the whole tone scale as Guitar_Theory suggested is commonly thought of to be the most "mysterious" sounding on its own.
#9
Wow, now I am lost! Thanks anyway, I'll try to figure this out.
#13
Quote by :-D
No, don't worry; what's your question?


My question was if there was any scale that sounded mystical?


I'll try the scales you've mentioned in the thread and try to find a mystical sounding out of it for my riffs in my next song.

-Gulli05
#14
My question was if there was any scale that sounded mystical?


Not inherently. In the grand scheme of things, the scale you use is very nearly irrelevant. There is no scale that "sounds mystical". Mystical (besides being an incredibly vague term to begin with) is a product of all the separate elements of the music together (tempo, rhythm, timber, harmony, articulation, melody)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
Quote by blue_strat
Also, Lydian (1 2 3 #4 5 6 7) and Double Harmonic (1 b2 3 4 5 b6 7).


I never heard of double harmonic before. Where would I encounter that? Is it a mode of the harmonic or melodic minor that I may have already come across, but with a different name??
#16
He wasn't asking about other things. His question was about scales.

EDIT: To Archeo Avis

Also, if i'm correct in reading, the double harmonic seems to be the same as phrygian dominant.
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

Quote by Son.Of.TheViper

I love you
Last edited by Psychedelico at May 11, 2008,
#17
Quote by Archeo Avis
Not inherently. In the grand scheme of things, the scale you use is very nearly irrelevant. There is no scale that "sounds mystical". Mystical (besides being an incredibly vague term to begin with) is a product of all the separate elements of the music together (tempo, rhythm, timber, harmony, articulation, melody)



I would say its highly relevant. While all of the other elements are factors, each scale has a particular sound on its own. its not inappropriate or uncommon to to recognize those different sounds or to utilize a particular scale to achieve them.

Quote by Psychedelico
He wasn't asking about other things. His question was about scales.


Exactly
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 11, 2008,
#18
I was reading about a Phrygian mode/scale and noticed some people talked about it, what my scale book said: "Phrygian gives an eerie sounding tone."
And if my dictionary is right that means it sounds mysterious, right?
#19
Quote by Gulli05
I was reading about a Phrygian mode/scale and noticed some people talked about it, what my scale book said: "Phrygian gives an eerie sounding tone."
And if my dictionary is right that means it sounds mysterious, right?


well it's a bit subjective. You'll have to mess around with phrygian and see how it sounds to you.
#20
Ok, thanks for all the help, I'll just mess around with the scales mentioned in the thread and find it out.

Thanks for all the help.
#21
Quote by iron.zeppelin
phrygian dominant


+1, Yngiwie Malmsteen uses that one alot i love it
gear:
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Ibanez RG
Peavey Nitro
Takamine EG-351SSC
Bugera 333xl 212

My Music:
MySpace
Facebook
add me!
#22
Quote by lpcustom325
+1, Yngiwie Malmsteen uses that one alot i love it
Yngwie uses the harmonic minor a lot. I don't hear much Phrygian Dominant in his work.

(No, they're not the same!)

Quote by Gulli05
I was reading about a Phrygian mode/scale and noticed some people talked about it, what my scale book said: "Phrygian gives an eerie sounding tone."
And if my dictionary is right that means it sounds mysterious, right?
It has a dark, Middle Eastern sound. I wouldn't go with eerie and mysterious, but see if it works.

Quote by Psychedelico
Also, if i'm correct in reading, the double harmonic seems to be the same as phrygian dominant.
Double Harmonic has a nat7.
#24
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Yngwie uses the harmonic minor a lot. I don't hear much Phrygian Dominant in his work.

(No, they're not the same!)

.


true they aren't the same but they are similar and he told GuitarWorld in the most recent issue that it is one of the scales that he uses alot
gear:
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser FR
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Ibanez RG
Peavey Nitro
Takamine EG-351SSC
Bugera 333xl 212

My Music:
MySpace
Facebook
add me!
#25
carlos santanna's got some creepy soundin licks that get under your skin. Cant say if it's mystic or not. I think I met a hooker whose call name was mystic

GIGGIDDY GIGGIDDY