#1
So I just recently got a new Epiphone Les Paul and I was hoping that the noisiness that my old squier was infamous for would be gone but it's not.

By noisiness, I mean other strings love to hum along when I'm playing, drastically interfering with not only the sound, but my playing as well because I'm continually trying to mute them so I don't sound so terrible!

I have a DigiTech RP350 and I use the "Noise Gate" feature a lot because my best understanding of it is that it sets a minimum for how much a string must vibrate before you can hear it through the amp. It helps some but should I even need it?

What am I doing wrong?
#2
you UPgraded to an epi?
next time save up for a better guitar, thats all i can say really
Gear:
Jackson DKMG Dinky (EMG 81/85)
Ibanez GIO (i put a Dimbucker in the bridge)
Crate GT65 (65 watts) to be upgraded soon, suggestions welcome (must be tubed)
Floor Pod (for sale)
#4
If you cant mute the strings properly then you have to practice more. No guitar in the world will do that better. By noisy guitars you usually mean feedback and pick-ups picking up background noise and stuff.
"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace" - Jimi Hendrix
#5
You just have to learn to play better I think.
You ppb touch strings next to the 1 you had to touch by accident when you lift your fingers.
Or you touch wrong strings with the palm of your right hand (if you're right handed ofc).

What's also very possible is that you pick way too much gain and overdrive and I don't know what else. The more gain you put, the less it takes for a sound to get through. Your strings always vibrate a little bit, and if you don't control your playing on high gain it 'll quickly sound messy and noisy. Palm mute the strings you're not playing ^^

From what you said here, I'd say your problem is almost definately a case of technique and experience. Don't blaim your equipment for it, and don't try to solve it with other equipment.
#6
amp?
settings? (amp AND multi FX)
Actually called Mark!

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#7
Quote by Base Ics
You just have to learn to play better I think.

Quote by KnarkoV
If you cant mute the strings properly then you have to practice more.

Thanks guys, that's what I thought.

Quote by Base Ics
What's also very possible is that you pick way too much gain and overdrive and I don't know what else. The more gain you put, the less it takes for a sound to get through. Your strings always vibrate a little bit, and if you don't control your playing on high gain it 'll quickly sound messy and noisy.

That's probably part of it. The volume knob is always on 10 when I play, so I'll turn that down and crank the amp/pedal up some to compensate.
#8
Better get used to it. See, the better the guitar, the more you're going to notice this, until you succumb to it and play forward. It's called "resonance" and natural harmonics are the basis for it. A decently built guitar, i.e., one that has it's frets spaced correctly, scale length right on, nut and bridge set at the right points, right on intonation, and fine tuned, will do this naturally, without you aiming to do so, and it's a good thing(usually). It's what gives a guitar's sound depth and color. Try this to prove my point: set your guitar on it's stand near a stereo, then pop in whatever cd you like. From time to time during different songs, start touching the strings and you'll notice that some are vibrating. Different ones at different times in the song. How is this? You aren't playing the guitar, but the strings are still vibrating. And if they are vibrating, you can be sure the guitar is making sound, especially if it's an acoustic.
Wiki resonance and natural harmonics in order to read and understand more. It's not a bad thing.
#9
Quote by LeftyDave
Better get used to it. See, the better the guitar, the more you're going to notice this, until you succumb to it and play forward. It's called "resonance" and natural harmonics are the basis for it. A decently built guitar, i.e., one that has it's frets spaced correctly, scale length right on, nut and bridge set at the right points, right on intonation, and fine tuned, will do this naturally, without you aiming to do so, and it's a good thing(usually). It's what gives a guitar's sound depth and color. Try this to prove my point: set your guitar on it's stand near a stereo, then pop in whatever cd you like. From time to time during different songs, start touching the strings and you'll notice that some are vibrating. Different ones at different times in the song. How is this? You aren't playing the guitar, but the strings are still vibrating. And if they are vibrating, you can be sure the guitar is making sound, especially if it's an acoustic.
Wiki resonance and natural harmonics in order to read and understand more. It's not a bad thing.

That's all true but when you're playing and constantly touching your strings they'll never get time to decently vibrate from background noise. Plus, whilst playing regular background sounds are all overpowered by your own guitar playing, so the only way you'll get resonance is if you play a note at a similar frequency to that of untouched open strings. And even if you were to accidentally create a harmonic like that it would never sound bad as it's the exact same note that you're playing at the time it forms (unless of course the note you meant to play was false). So harmonics won't cause trouble with noise whilst playing in the way you mentioned m8.
#10
Quote by LeftyDave
Better get used to it. <-snip-> It's not a bad thing.

Awesome post!

I'm already familiar with resonance and natural harmonics, and figured they were the basis for the "problem" I'm having, but I didn't know if there was anything I could do to reduce the impact. From what I gather, turning the volume down on the guitar end and up on the amp end is a good start, no?

Here's a good test for anyone who isn't 100% sure what problem I'm referring to. With at least some considerable level of distortion on, hold a note on the 7th fret on the 4th string (d) for about 5 seconds, being sure not to touch any of the other strings. Then immediately move to the 8th fret. On both of my guitars the 8th fret note will not be clean at all, due to the interference with whatever other strings on the guitar were still mimicking the 7th fret note.

Thanks to LeftyDave for explaining the reasoning behind this, and for others for posting potential solutions. Is it safe to say that this happens on all guitars if the sound levels are not set right?

Any further advice from anyone?
#11
Quote by blacklespaul86
Awesome post!
Any further advice from anyone?

What you said is possible then. You're playing an A, which causes you 5th string to vibrate a little bit.
Mute your A-string when playing those note and it 'll all be fine.

Sorry for the misunderstanding, I didn't think you'd be holding the note like 5 seconds to then switch to another note on the same string (what song are you playing? :S)
#12
Quote by Base Ics
I didn't think you'd be holding the note like 5 seconds to then switch to another note on the same string (what song are you playing? :S)



It doesn't necessarily come up in that way, but thats a good way to understand what I'm referring to in case there was any confusion.

It just seems that when I play, there are a lot of notes that for whatever reason don't sound clean like they should. I can accept that it's something I'm doing wrong, but I just need(ed) to know what that is exactly so I can correct it.
#13
So looking at the clock, I just played for about an hour (since my last post). I tried adjusting my levels and it made a pretty good difference, but I think the biggest difference will be over time as I get more comfortable with my new guitar and get better at playing in general.

I also happen to be training myself to play standing up since I'm always sitting when I play. It's nearly impossible for me to play even easy songs while standing up, so I've got a lot to learn.