#1
Ok up until now i pretty much have just been looking at tabs and playing to what i like.
Is it important to learn music theory if you want to be a good guitarist and know what every thing is? I know ignorance isnt good but , just needed some opinions from others.
Indecision is the source of chaos.
#2
Quote by PirateSteve
Ok up until now i pretty much have just been looking at tabs and playing to what i like.
Is it important to learn music theory if you want to be a good guitarist and know what every thing is? I know ignorance isnt good but , just needed some opinions from others.


Important? it just depends on your goals. if your interested I would certainly encourage you to learn about it. Keep in mind it takes time and a lot of work to learn.

You can make great music simply by listening and playing alot (and practicing ofcourse), but if you want to learn about how and why things work, theory can offer you that to a large extent.
#3
Hmm well , i recently read an article about yngwie malmsteen and how he got where he was. It seemed he learned alot of musical theory. I kinda wanna learn from feel rather than be a textbook person about playing an instrument i guess.
Indecision is the source of chaos.
#4
Theory is not a necessity if you wanna be a good guitar player, but it can definitely help you get there. For instance, knowing a scale or mode well, might help you learn songs in the future, even when using tabs. Some tabs are not very good, and might show fingering positions that are hardly ideal when actually put into a practical context. If you can go "hey, I know that scale" then you might be able to move the same notes to a different part of the neck, playing it in a manner that you like better, without changing the actual song. Also, when writing music, things might make some more sense once you understand what sounds "good" and what sounds dissonant according to theory.

However, music does not always make sense. Many of the greatest musicians of all time have hardly been theoretical geniuses.

I'd work on my ear first, if I was you. A good ear along with a good feel for the instrument you play can't be beaten by theory. The essence of good music is what sounds good, not what looks good on paper.
#5
Im not entirely sure on how to train my ear , i mean i can try to play a song ive heard without the tabs , sometimes it sounds alright i guess. Its hard to come up with sounds i want , i can know em in my head but if i dont know the sound on the guitar of what i want its hard to find how i wanna play it. Hard to explain.
Indecision is the source of chaos.
#6
Quote by PirateSteve
Hmm well , i recently read an article about yngwie malmsteen and how he got where he was. It seemed he learned alot of musical theory. I kinda wanna learn from feel rather than be a textbook person about playing an instrument i guess.


yeah I hear ya. Well if your not interested it, I wouldnt worry about it. Go with what inspires you to play. You may come to a point in the future where music theory seems interesting to you..... that would be a good time to check it out. If not, thats ok to. Bottom line: make music and enjoy it.

btw, as far as being a "textbook" person.... yeah they do exist, but you can learn theory, and still continue to play with feel as you are now. Its just a matter of realizing whats important to you, and sticking with it. Theory wont take that away from you. It'll just give you some new tools to work with.

Quote by PirateSteve
Im not entirely sure on how to train my ear , i mean i can try to play a song ive heard without the tabs , sometimes it sounds alright i guess. Its hard to come up with sounds i want , i can know em in my head but if i dont know the sound on the guitar of what i want its hard to find how i wanna play it. Hard to explain.


learn as many songs as you can. Try to learn them by ear, and memorize them, dont read them off your tab book. Ofcourse learning from tab is ok, but dont rely on it.... you will never train your ear that way. Learning theory btw can help you ear as well. In the long run it will be another way to identify those things your hearing in your head.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 10, 2008,
#7
Whenever i was in junior high i had a music class and just trying to learn sheet music had no use for it back then , would of been helpful if i listened i guess. Ive never really given a thought to learning cords , i just play it. I dunno i guess im a dumb musician. Hard to change from what ive been doing to something new.
Indecision is the source of chaos.
#8
It's not about changing. It's adding another skill to your arsenal. If you are motivated and inspired to learn theory, then do it, as it won't hurt you. But try learning something on your own initiative that you aren't really interested in learning, and you will fail.
#9
right now id have to say im an intermediate player , the only way i can play advanced tabs are if i just practice the hell out of em.
Indecision is the source of chaos.
#10
Look at it this way; you don't need theory to be a good guitar player, but you do need it to be a good musician.

Even a small amount of theory can help you improve how you improvise solos or write songs. It just expands your options. The real trick is learning when you really need to use that knowledge and when to simply play by feel and ignore the theory aspect.
#11
Ok thanks for all your replies it really helped.
Indecision is the source of chaos.
#12
Quote by icronic
Look at it this way; you don't need theory to be a good guitar player, but you do need it to be a good musician.
.


Not really, you can be a good musician without theory. Im all for encouraging people to learn it, but that statements just not true.

Quote by Cuddrow
It's not about changing. It's adding another skill to your arsenal. If you are motivated and inspired to learn theory, then do it, as it won't hurt you. But try learning something on your own initiative that you aren't really interested in learning, and you will fail.


+1 very well said.
#13
Quote by icronic
Look at it this way; you don't need theory to be a good guitar player, but you do need it to be a good musician.

Even a small amount of theory can help you improve how you improvise solos or write songs. It just expands your options. The real trick is learning when you really need to use that knowledge and when to simply play by feel and ignore the theory aspect.



I agree, theory only helps if you need it, but I suggest you learn little by little. You don't need to sit there with a textbook for 3 hours to be a good musician that would be too stressful for most people. From what you have said, you only play what you like. I suggest that you learn what the notes are on the guitar for a starter. Theres 6 strings, and usually 24 frets. Learn what the notes are and the different ways of playing them. This will especially help with ear and getting the sound out of your head and into a song.
#14
Quote by PirateSteve
Hmm well , i recently read an article about yngwie malmsteen and how he got where he was. It seemed he learned alot of musical theory. I kinda wanna learn from feel rather than be a textbook person about playing an instrument i guess.

There's no such thing as a feel player - a good guitarist knows what SOUNDS right. Theory gives you a better understand of what sounds right and why it sounds right - you can't tell me that's not going to help you. To play by "feel" you still need to know what sounds are at your disposal in order to best express your emotions through music.

Sure you can wait around and work it all out for yourself, but ultimately you're just going to come to the same conclusions that people came to 500 years ago and kindly wrote down so we wouldn't have to waste time working it all out again.
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#15
^^^

Percisely (Sp?). It sucks to be in a deep emotional passage and then hit a wrong note and completely kill what you were trying to do.

I study theory and apply it to prevent that from happening.