#2
There's a lot of use of harmonic and melodic minor, though any scale would be fine depending on the harmonic context. Sweep picked arpeggios are very common.
#3
Don't forget the diminished arpeggios and whole tone scale to add some extra flavor to those specialized minor scales.
#4
^+1. Classic. Yngwie Malmsteen or Tony McAlpine maybe.
#6
Quote by mjkshreds
what are some scales chords, arpeggios ect i could use in neo classical metal
It's pretty much sweep picked arpeggios, harmonic minor scalar runs, pedal points and using leading tones. Theres more to it, but that will get you started.
#7
Neoclassical heavy metal uses alot of sweeped arpeggios, harmonic minor, melodic minor, pedal points diminished and phrygian licks are abundant.


Without the harmonic minor scale or the phrygian mode neoclassical metal would sound nothing like it does today.


A pedal point is when a repeating sequence of notes is played along with a melody .


Example:
l-------------------------------------
l------------5---4------5---4--------5---4-- <---Pedal
l--------------------6--------------4-----------3 <---Melody
l-------------------------------------------------
l-------------------------------------------------
l-------------------------------------------------


Example of Neoclassical lick:

tapped
l---------------------5---6---8---13/14---8---6---5--------------------------------------
l-------------------7-------------------------------------7--6-------------------------------
l----------------8---------------------------------------------8-6-5------------------------
l---------------------------------------------------------------------8-7--------------------
l-------------------------------------------------------------------------11-10-7----------
l-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------11-10-7

There's a neoclassical lick sorry if it sux

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#8
The pedal point he was talking about is simular/same as an austinato, and sounds very classical as it is used frequently in classical music. Here is a general example that might help.

|-12-11-12-9-12----12---12---12--
|--------------------12---11----9------

practicing these tends to also sharpen your finger placement/moevements/speed, etc.
#9
Michael Romeo (symphony x) uses the whole tone scale a lot especially when tapping. The intervals are all the same so it's easier to play faster, and has a nice sound to it. He also uses the diminished scale a lot. These are two scales I seem to not often find in theory descussoins (spelling?).
#10
Quote by Beings_Mythos
Michael Romeo (symphony x) uses the whole tone scale a lot especially when tapping. The intervals are all the same so it's easier to play faster, and has a nice sound to it. He also uses the diminished scale a lot. These are two scales I seem to not often find in theory descussoins (spelling?).
Those 2 scales shouldnt be used exclusively over anything (unless by diminished scale you mean any scale with a b5). They're used for creating some quick dissonance/interesting licks.
#11
I probibly should have mentiond that. He uses them a lot in general. Here's the video i got it from. He goes through harmonic minor, then diminished, then whole tone. After that he goes into some more classical examples, that are typical but still very interesting. It might help someone get some ideas though.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=NVm_QeeMtyw&feature=related
#12
Quote by Beings_Mythos
The pedal point he was talking about is simular/same as an austinato, and sounds very classical as it is used frequently in classical music. Here is a general example that might help.


spell check * Ostinato *

jeesh i feel like an ass now. It's hard spelling by sounding it out when you have a thick Maine accent