#1
in music class we are covering chords, one of those topics was resolving chords, now no offence to my teacher but he ccan't explain things very well and this was no exception. all he did was ramble on about notes and not explain resolving chords at all. so could someone please explain how to figure out what chords resolve to what.
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Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
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along with fire escape routes...

#3
ok, so 7th chords resolve to the chords that are 3 and a half steps below, what about straight major and minor?
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Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#4
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ok, so 7th chords resolve to the chords that are 3 and a half steps below, what about straight major and minor?
Major and minor chords can stand on their own, but chord progressions resolve certain ways.

Run a search for "cadence" and "common chord progression."
#5
ok thanks.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#6
G7 resolves very noticably to C because 3 of the notes in it are only a semitone or tone away from the notes in C, plus there's the G which features in both chords.

In root position, and the same octave:

G -> G
B -> C
D -> E or C
F -> E or G

The F generally sounds like it's falling a semitone to E, as it's closer than the G, and the 4/3 suspension is common in Western music, for example:

GBDF -> CFG -> CEG

G7 -> Csus4 -> C
#7
Did you're teacher mention the term 'tritone'. G7 contains this interval which are the notes F & B (they are 3 tones apart hence the name). Cos of the in-built tension in the tritone, its making the G7 wanting to resolve. When you resolve this to Cmaj (it is a V-I progression which is a classic resolve in jazz especially) the F is lowered a half step to E, and the B is raised a half step to C. The interval now is a major 3rd (or minor 6th). This tension to resolve is known as 'perfect cadence'. Re. the intervals - inverting them always, always add up to 9, and the quality of the interval changes too - e.g major to minor or vice versa. The only exception being the perfect 4ths and 5ths. They add up to 9 but always remain perfect. And a tritone is still a tritone.

I guess the general rule is that the V resolves to the I.
#8
^+1 i read half your post cuz i'm tired but still, nice stuff.

TS, do a search on "Cadences". If you need a better explanation i would have no problem whatsoever typing out everything in my music theory book about them lol.
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#9
As a general rule, chords resolve/move to their fourth (or fifth, but not as well IMO) degree chord.

Do you know much about cadences, T/S?
#10
honestly i have never heard the term before, anyone care to enlighten?
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#11
from my knoledge,
a perfect cadence is ending a song by going from the fifth and ending on the tonic.

an imperfect cadence is going from the forth to the tonic to end.
#12
Quote by HethaHORRIFIC
from my knoledge,
a perfect cadence is ending a song by going from the fifth and ending on the tonic.

an imperfect cadence is going from the forth to the tonic to end.
That last one is called a plagal cadence, not an imperfect cadence. An imperfect cadence is going from any chord to the V chord.

A cadence is just the term given to the different ways of resolving progression. Its usually written in scale intervals, as in I for the first chord of the scale and V for the fifth chord. Its in roman numerals BTW.

Heres a list of cadences: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadence_(music)
Last edited by demonofthenight at May 12, 2008,