#1
So, I was thinking about teaching drums at a local music store for the summer. Since I was teaching drums, and not guitar I posted a thread on drummerworld.com asking about teaching in a music store and if they would hire someone my age (i'm 18) and with my experience (3 years) I stated that I had taken private lessons for 2 years and am currently giving both guitar and drum lessons to kids ages 7-12 , and would only be giving lessons to beginners.

So after some replies the basic consensus was that no one would ever trust an 18 year old to teach an instrument and that you should have at least 10 years experience of playing and teaching, because it could not be possible for someone who's only been playing for 3 years to adequately teach a kid the basics of drumming.

I am extremely put off by everyone on drummerworld's comments. If you are more interested read here My Thread

So UG what do you think about an 18 year old giving lessons?
#2
I think no one would ever trust an 18 year old to teach an instrument and that you should have at least 10 years experience of playing and teaching, because it could not be possible for someone who's only been playing for 3 years to adequately teach a kid the basics of drumming.
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#3
my little bros 14 and i got a 16 year old to teach him kid is quite good and has played for 5 or 6 years but doesnt matter age shouldnt matter
#4
My friend is 16 and he subs in for his teacher when he goes on tour, so yeah you should be fine. Its not necessarily how long you've been playing, its if you can teach the kid the proper technique.
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#5
Its not necessarily how long you've been playing, its if you can teach the kid the proper technique.


Thats what I've been saying but no one can seem to believe that. This is more of a vent after hearing such poor responses from the other forum. UG I'm here to stay!
#6
I currently teach a 7yr. old, 13 yr. old, and a 40yr. old. I've been playing for 5yrs. and I'm 16. They like me, trust me, and I know my crap. Win-Win.
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#7
Considering you only have 3 years experience, I would say no right off the bat. Unless you're an incredibly talented drummer capable of teaching drummers up to an advanced level.
Age has no limits, but years experience does. One of my guitar teachers is only 20-22 years old, but he's extremely talented.
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#8
I've taught two kids who both made huge advances, but they got bored pretty quickly and quit. Of course, they were both 9 years old, and loved Green Day.

I remember specifically, when one of them asked to play some song that involved open chords:

Me: "Ok, well this first chord is a D. Let's work on that first."
Kid: "What? Why do you have to use 3 fingers? I don't like those chords."

Damn power chord kids.
#9
I was 14 and I taught a 17 year-old a couple songs.

I'm never in this forum...
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#10
If you've only been playing for three years then what happens when someone comes who is really naturaly gifted or something and learns at three times the rate you did?

If you don't hold them back from learning too fast (which would make you a crap teacher if you did) the whithin one year he'll be at the equivelant of three of your years while you'll be ate four of your years.

One more year and he'll be at the equivalent of six of your years while you'll be at five which will mean you won't be able to play some of the stuff your telling him to learn and you might not know what to teach him.

The moral of the story is:
People who go to be taught at a music shop probably don't expect to have to change teacher so three years probably isn't enough.
People who want to have a cheaper, less experienced teacher to teach them the basics before getting a better teacher wouldn't mind three years experience.
#11
Quote by 12345abcd3
If you've only been playing for three years then what happens when someone comes who is really naturaly gifted or something and learns at three times the rate you did?


If there was a student that I felt I did not have sufficient knowledge to teach then I would recommend him to a different instructor. Somehow I don't think it will be that traumatizing for a student to switch teachers.

Whenever i took lessons at a shop they wouldn't be any different from private lessons at a guy's house. I don't think parents sign their kids up for lessons at a music shop, expecting it to be the pinnacle of teaching.