#1
Hey, sorry if you think this is a dumb question, but i've never concentrated on writing my own music, now i do, how do i do it?

I've tried jumblimng different notes together but it sounded gay. What do i have to know to write a solo or riff in a day?

Thanks heaps
#4
Lean a few scales...

The pentatonic and the Aeolian will take u far in
commercial music standards of today..

play on a scale long enough and a lick will just
happen....seriously
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
#7
Learn the cliches, like all the stuff that SRV stole from hendrix (not that that's bad, SRV's in my top 5 guitar players) Listen to some Muddy Waters, or T-Bone Walker, etc. All the delta blues licks are classics.
#9
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
okay, so a scale is a group of different frets on the guitar?

Technically you could think of it this way, but it's much more beneficial from a musical standpoint to think in terms of notes and intervals.
#10
cool, so once i learn a scale i can write my own music just by playing around on that scale?
#11
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
cool, so once i learn a scale i can write my own music just by playing around on that scale?

Yep, scales are really the building blocks for all music. Like I said, learning some music theory will really benefit you as well and it ties in directly with scales and chord progressions. It ties in with all musical concepts, actually.
#12
if i have a riff in my head, i should be able to play it through a scale?

And is there blues, rock, jazz scales, or do all scales sound the same?

How long would it take to learn a scale?

Those are my final questions.
#13
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
if i have a riff in my head, i should be able to play it through a scale?

And is there blues, rock, jazz scales, or do all scales sound the same?

How long would it take to learn a scale?

Those are my final questions.

Yes, all riffs are in some way related to some scale. Certain scales will give you a more rock or jazz feel and different feels in general because you're accustomed to hearing them in specific genres and contexts, but a huge part of the feel of what you're playing depends on the harmonic context that you're playing in.

There's no set time to learn a scale, really; what's important is that you learn the notes and intervals and then experiment with different ways to apply it.

If you have any other questions I'll be happy to answer them as well.
#16
keep listening to music you like..

do that, and at the same time be sure to take note what kinda scales is being utilized and how choices of notes are stacked with it.

once you've got some inspiration, use some other scales, or maybe the same one, and keep whacking out what you can out of it. with some patience, you'll be able to belt out a riff or two. then you can do stuff like alter the notes or go an octave down, add some palm muting etc etc...

thats how i got started..


cheers
#17
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
if i have a riff in my head, i should be able to play it through a scale?
One of the most useful and difficult skills is being able to hear something in your head and then play it. If you have a lick in your head, it will fit into some kind of scale (perhaps the chromatic scale), though it may be something odd and nonstandard that you've never heard of before, especially if you get into Eastern music.

Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
And is there blues, rock, jazz scales, or do all scales sound the same?
Not all scales sound the same! C Major is very different than C Locrian (play them). However, there are not genre-specific scales. You can play the Dorian scale in blues, jazz, rock, metal, whatever you want. Some scales will be better suited for certain genres. You generally wouldn't play en E Phrygian lick in an E blues, but it would be great for a lot of metal. However, there isn't a special "jazz scale" or "rock scale." There is a blues scale, and it is often used in blues music (shocking, yes ), but it is used in other styles as well.

Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
How long would it take to learn a scale?
The notes? Ten seconds. Once you know intervals, you can figure out any scale quickly. Learning how to play it all over the neck takes a while. And then learning how to play it well takes years.
#18
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
if i have a riff in my head, i should be able to play it through a scale?



If you have a riff in your head, just think of it note by note, and try to play it on guitar. You dont really need to learn the scale to get the riff out of your head. A scale will just help you evolve on from that riff.
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#19
Ok 1st you got to learn some scales, and some theory would help. The scales you would probably want to start off with would be Pentatonic scales practically every guitarist use them. Then Maybe learn the blues scales, the natural minor scales, and the harmonic minor scales.
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#21
Quote by /\AC/\DC/\
Hey, sorry if you think this is a dumb question, but i've never concentrated on writing my own music, now i do, how do i do it?

I've tried jumblimng different notes together but it sounded gay. What do i have to know to write a solo or riff in a day?

Thanks heaps


how many songs can you play by memory?

If you can play a decent amount of songs ( and can play them well). You can write your own music. Just use your ear, and be creative. Not everything you write is going to be great. At 1st you just have to try putting some chords / notes together until you find something you like. Use the songs you do know as models. I don't mean copy them, but you can get ideas of how a riff is put together.