#1
This summer I was thinking about going to a pawn shop and getting a super crappy electric to try out making a fretless guitar. I'm wondering if anyone has any tips on what to do and what is the best material to fill in the gaps of the frets on the guitar.
Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks
#3
take the frets out carefully, and use powder from either a lighter kind of wood, or the same kind (depending on whether you want to know where the frets would be or not), and mix it with superglue when you put it in, it makes a great filler
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#4
you could shave down the frets so theyre at the same level as the fretboard, youd have to make them all really seamless though. i'd reccomend making the nut lower too, the only reason its so low is because of the frets
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#5
I just did this to one of my basses. I filled in the gaps where the frets used to be with wood filler. If you use filler fill the gaps in layers and make sure you fill the entire gap.
You can also stick strips of timber or something into the gaps and then sand the strips down so they are flush with fret board.

And to spiderjerusalem, I would not recommend filling down the frets because it would be difficult to remove the entire protruding part of the fret with out damaging the fret board or leaving burs that could catch on the strings or your fingers.
#6
I was just about to do this with a bass im gonna get from ebay.

This is the site I plan on doing it from. Check it out. It looks pretty good to me

Quote by 24fRETSoFfURY
I just did this to one of my basses. I filled in the gaps where the frets used to be with wood filler. If you use filler fill the gaps in layers and make sure you fill the entire gap.
You can also stick strips of timber or something into the gaps and then sand the strips down so they are flush with fret board.

And to spiderjerusalem, I would not recommend filling down the frets because it would be difficult to remove the entire protruding part of the fret with out damaging the fret board or leaving burs that could catch on the strings or your fingers.


I was just wondering if you have to seal or finish the fretboard after you did it and with what? And did you use like an online tutorial or just wing it? How did it turn out? I'm planning on doing the same thing pretty soon here.
Last edited by tjfishrocker at May 11, 2008,
#7
Quote by tjfishrocker
Sorry for the double post but i was just wondering if you have to seal or finish the fretboard after you did it and with what? And did you use like an online tutorial or just wing it? How did it turn out? I'm planning on doing the same thing pretty soon here.


I haven’t strung it up yet (still need to wire up the electronics) so I haven’t play it yet, anyway,
I sealed the fretboard with the same oil/sealant that I’m using on the body.
I'm not sure if you have to but I did help protect against wear and tear.
I read though a bunch of online tutorials and through some of the info on this site and then just figured it out as I went.
The neck has turned out quite good so far, though we’ll see how it plays in a few weeks when I string it up.
#8
For removing frets heat them with a soldering iron and then work them out slowly so you don't chip the wood around the frets.


And some people lacquer the fretboards. Less necessary with flatwounds afaik.
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