#1
Lately I've been working on my alternate picking speed.

I've been using a metronome and working on various hammers and pulls across all six strings and different frets.

1 hammer to 2 etc.

5 hammer to 7 etc.

7 hammer to 10 etc.

Like that ^


I've been focusing on two strings at a time E A.....D G.....B E


Is this the right way to go? Should I be practicing all six strings at once or should I be splitting them up like I have been?


If anyone has any effective alternate picking advice that'd be great


Thanks
#2
I've been trying to sharpen mine up, and I've found that when I learned it, I did a lot of two string deals two notes per string, back and forth, so I do those faster than the normal progressions now. What I've found is harder is running through the modes because there's typically three notes per string, so you actually do alternate up and down when switching strings.

I would say, find what you do slowest, and practice that. If you get to breaking things down and stuff, you will tend to get stuck in those ruts in the middle of solos, which makes you sound bad.
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"People don't kill people with giant boulders"
"They will if you take away their assault rifles"

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#3
I formed the routine when I was trying to perfect "The Widow" By The Mars Volta. The solo in that song using fast alternate picking on B and E

8--5-- 8--5
8--5 8--5


So in order to get better I've taken that interval (3 frets) and started practicing it in two string patterns.

I suppose I'll keep doing that but I'll keep working on all six strings as well.
#4
In addition to chromatic runs, three-note-per-string exercises are very helpful for alternate picking because you're forced to change the direction of the pickstroke when moving to the next string. Something like this A minor scalar run would be good (play it descending too of course):

e--------------------------------------------7-8-10---------------------------------------------------------
B----------------------------------6-8-10------------------------------------------------------------------
G--------------------------5-7-9--------------------------------------------------------------------------
D------------------5-7-9----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A----------5-7-8------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E--5-7-8--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#5
In addition to chromatic runs, three-note-per-string exercises are very helpful for alternate picking because you're forced to change the direction of the pickstroke when moving to the next string. Something like this A minor scalar run would be good (play it descending too of course):

Yes, this guy pretty much said what I meant, but clearer. YOu know, the "change the direction of the pickstroke" thing.
If Rock is a lifestyle, then Metal's an addiction

"People don't kill people with giant boulders"
"They will if you take away their assault rifles"

Quote by Gee-tar-eist
I wouldnt give a ****, i would gladly play music for people to steal it!
#6
I'll be sure to keep all this in mind. Thanks for the help everyone.

For some reason it seems to be just the two string patterns that are slowing me down. I think it has something to do with interval. The switch between 8 and 5, 1 and 4 etc is really hard for me to do a high speed.
#8
Yeah....I just started using it regularly about a month or two ago so it's significantly weaker than the rest of my fingers. I'm sure that it's just a matter of time and practice before I'll be up to speed. I'm just making sure that I'm practicing properly. Whenever there's an interval of 3 or more I always use my index and my pinky.


The more I pay attention the more it seems like of issue of my picking hand as well as my fretting hand.