#1
My improvisation is not going anywhere lately. I've been recording chord changes, then practicing improvising over the changes, but really the melodies that I make don't really reflect the chord changes at all. It's like, if I were to completely remove the backing track, the melody would sound like the backing track consisted of just one chord- that chord being the I chord of the chord progression.

Now, I try to remedy this by focusing on landing on each note of the progression. For instance, if the progression is C-Am-F , I'd shoot for a C during the C part, and an A during the Am part... etc, but then my melodies start to sound less musical and more mechanical. When I try to play without thinking, I can get more emotion (if that makes sense) out of my playing, but it sounds less technical.

And then when I think more and try to play more technical, the "oomph" goes out of the playing and the melody suffers.


What are some strategies to make the melodies reflect the chord changes, but keeping them interesting?
#2
Quote by lemonsquares42
My improvisation is not going anywhere lately. I've been recording chord changes, then practicing improvising over the changes, but really the melodies that I make don't really reflect the chord changes at all. It's like, if I were to completely remove the backing track, the melody would sound like the backing track consisted of just one chord- that chord being the I chord of the chord progression.

Now, I try to remedy this by focusing on landing on each note of the progression. For instance, if the progression is C-Am-F , I'd shoot for a C during the C part, and an A during the Am part... etc, but then my melodies start to sound less musical and more mechanical. When I try to play without thinking, I can get more emotion (if that makes sense) out of my playing, but it sounds less technical.

And then when I think more and try to play more technical, the "oomph" goes out of the playing and the melody suffers.


What are some strategies to make the melodies reflect the chord changes, but keeping them interesting?



Perhaps instead of forcusing for a C during the C part and A during Am part, you should focus on ending/starting the riff for that part on that note.

For example: C is the chord, you start with a C note and play something with emotion like you said then perhaps end on a C or hit an A as the chord goes onto the Am.

Does that help?
#3
Why does it have to sound technical? Best soloing I've ever done was when I hooked my electric in for recording but muted the monitors so I didn't get to hear it while I was playing (I just had the rhythm section playing through the headphones and the guitar wasn't amplified). First time I played it back I was like "What the f***?! This doesn't suck!!" That's my story...
#4
I like to use my speed for short flurries of notes that sound fast and dificult, but not overly wankerish.

You have to practice integrating speed into your playing. You should be able to play a fast lick in a solo without sacrificing emotion (yes, there is emotion).

Friedman talks a lot about following chords in the link in my sig. I suggest watching it.
#5
I really don't know, as I'm facing this problem.

But if you're recording a solo for something that you've written, or are just composing a new solo to an old song, you have the luxury of listening to the solo section of that song and mapping out the idea that you want on it. If you can get an idea of what you want a solo to sound and feel like while playing it, then try and do that.

Also, bangoodcharlotte and atleast one other person here in the MT Forum have this Melodic Control video in their sig (it's two parts, though... Click the "Learn to Solo" part of that link) by Marty Friedman that is really useful. Try watching that.
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#6
Quote by mattvl
Why does it have to sound technical? Best soloing I've ever done was when I hooked my electric in for recording but muted the monitors so I didn't get to hear it while I was playing (I just had the rhythm section playing through the headphones and the guitar wasn't amplified). First time I played it back I was like "What the f***?! This doesn't suck!!" That's my story...


Haha, well the difference between you and me is that yours probably sounded good. Anyway, what I meant by technical was like, it sounds too monotonous.

I'd start up with the: land on a C during the C part and noodle around and then an A during the Am part... etc, but I'd do that for a couple times and repeat and before you know it, it all sounds the same.

I can't really figure out how to write interesting melodies while keeping those chord changes in mind. It seems like the progressions have so much potential for interesting melodies, but my melodies are all bland and uninteresting because they don't reflect the changes. Does that make sense?
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I like to use my speed for short flurries of notes that sound fast and dificult, but not overly wankerish.

You have to practice integrating speed into your playing. You should be able to play a fast lick in a solo without sacrificing emotion (yes, there is emotion).

Friedman talks a lot about following chords in the link in my sig. I suggest watching it.


Oh wow, the whole video. I saw a piece of the vid once before and I was looking for the rest of it, but I never found it.

I'll definately take a look at that. This looks very interesting.
#8
Use guidetones. Use thirds and sevenths, don't focus on hitting the root as much. Just try transferring from and to a third or seventh of the chord that's playing whenever the chord changes.

You'll see you'll start to hear the chord changes. Check this out by means of example:



As for "emotion"... That'll all come together when you've practised this stuff enough that you've internalised it.
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#9
Your rhythm part is in triads, right? Or do you play arpeggio's?

If you play triads, why not leave out key notes in the rhythm part and play those in the lead part. Even better would be to play the highest note in the lead part and the rest in the rhythm and bass parts.

Does this make any sense? I'm not sure I understand what you mean with chord changes. You're not modulating, are you?