#1
Hi guys,

I'm having a problem with my Yamaha APX-5A electro-acoustic.

The 6th string, when played open, seems to be tuned lower than when any fretted notes are played on it. For instance, if I play open E, then 12th fret E, the 12th fret E is noticeably higher pitched, by probably a quarter of a semi-tone or more.

I'm guessing this is a fairly common problem, but I have just never known anyone to have it.

Does anyone know what this problem is?
ahhhh!
#3
new strings solved that problem for me
Quote by elliott FTW
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#4
The problem is with my guitar, not me, without a doubt.

Tried replacing strings as well, which didn't help.
ahhhh!
#5
Quote by Crabby
Hi guys,

The 6th string, when played open, seems to be tuned lower than when any fretted notes are played on it. For instance, if I play open E, then 12th fret E, the 12th fret E is noticeably higher pitched, by probably a quarter of a semi-tone or more.

Does anyone know what this problem is?


Your description is a bit odd, but here goes. When in standard tuning, EADGBe, the 12th fret of all the strings should be exactly one octave higher than the open strings, and neither flat nor sharp. One full octave will be the complete note series through. For example, starting at the A string, you would have A in open position, A# at the first fret, B at the second, C at the third...so on until you reach A again at the 12th fret, which is one full octave up.
Intonation is the ability of a stringed instrument to play in tune across all frets, with each note being as close to true as possible. The adjustment points are the bridge saddle and the nut. Moving these two points either closer or farther away from each other will change the intonation, as you are lengthening or shortening the scale length of the guitar. Electrics are fairly easy to adjust as they have moveable saddles. Acoustics are a bit tougher as the saddle needs to be compensated in order to obtain correct intonation. Compensating a saddle is the act of filing/sanding an angle into the top of the saddle so that the string contact point moves, either closer to the nut or farther away from it. The other adjustment point, the nut, is more difficult yet to change as the nut needs to be removed from the neck, and is usually glued in place. The saddle is normally just slid into the slot in the bridge, and can be removed once all the strings are loose enough, or off entirely. Generally speaking, if the guitar plays in tune at the 1st-5th frets, but is off at the 12th, then the saddle needs compensating. Vice-versa if good at the 12th, but off at 1-5 then the nut needs repositioning.
#6
Thanks a lot LeftyDave, sounds like a task for the guitar shop then :P
ahhhh!
#7
Quote by Crabby
Thanks a lot LeftyDave, sounds like a task for the guitar shop then :P


EDIT: Thought you were talking about an electric.