#1
Does the neck on a neck thru usually consist of multiple pieces? Is it just one solid piece of maple or what? I ask b/c I am considering making a neck thru guitar. I know it's not easy by any stretch of the imagination, but any helpful tips would be great! (in addition to answering my question)
#3
Neck Thru means that the neck and the middle of the body of the guitar are one piece. There are two wings on the sides of the body that are bonded to that piece to form the rest of the body. Hope thats what you were looking for, though if you are making one, I would assume you already knew that.
#5
You could have laminates such as this guitar:



Where you have three maple lams with two small redder colour wood lams in between.
Quote by Liberation
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#6
Some people use single lengths of wood for neck throughs, other people prefer to glue a bunch of smaller splices together. It's cheaper to use one block, but a neck with a few splices will be less prone to warping.
#8
Quote by loonyguitarist
You could have laminates such as this guitar:



Where you have three maple lams with two small redder colour wood lams in between.


That's a bass.
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#9
I knew someone was going to say that
Quote by Liberation
Every time I see your avatar I want to slit your neck with a butterknife. Goddamn Pingu.
#10
same concept
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#12
Quote by ESP_Shreder
why would it be stupid to make it one piece?

It'd be much more prone to warping over time, and not nearly as strong.
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#13
yeah true. I see 3 piece thru necks alot too. But I have seen the 1 piece neck thru, or "The Oar" as I like to call it.
#14
yea... well I am gonna make an "Oar" out of solid maple. It's been aged quite a bit. No idea how long but really freaking long... atleast 5 years.
#15
Quote by ESP_Shreder
yea... well I am gonna make an "Oar" out of solid maple. It's been aged quite a bit. No idea how long but really freaking long... atleast 5 years.


I'm making a one-piece quarter sawn mahogany neck.. mainly because of the price, but also because it'll be my first build.. so things WILL go wrong!

Neck-through is definitely the best plan for beginning building, as you just have to glue the wings on.. no dodgy routing of neck pockets or tenon cavities.
#16
aged wood is nothing good at all. its not bad, but wood is wood. if you make it out of one piece, you are stupid. i am just saying, you are putting your time and effort to make a remarkable instrument, you would honestly be stupid to make it a one piece, youll be cutting your neck off in 2 or 3 years. atleast take that one peice, and rip it down the middle, flip a board over 180 degrees, and glue it back up, that will make it virtually invincible to warping.

and my friend, i live in northern virginia/maryland, the moisture content in the air is about 50% here. if wood is "aged" here, it will make it ALOT worse for working with. you will notice that "air-dried" lumber only comes from drier areas (midwest, etc).

dont be dumb man. its a simple thing to change/fix if you do it efore you start. 1/4 sawn, rock maple, whatever, its stupid.

like i said, rip it down the middle, flip one board over 180 degrees, and reglue it, it will not warp, reason being, if one side warps, the other side (which was flipped over the opposite direction) will counteract it, and the warp will not occur. heres my neck blank for my neck project where i did that :

Last edited by LP Addict at May 13, 2008,
#17
Quote by LP Addict
aged wood is nothing good at all. its not bad, but wood is wood. if you make it out of one piece, you are stupid. i am just saying, you are putting your time and effort to make a remarkable instrument, you would honestly be stupid to make it a one piece, youll be cutting your neck off in 2 or 3 years. atleast take that one peice, and rip it down the middle, flip a board over 180 degrees, and glue it back up, that will make it virtually invincible to warping.


Ergo, use quarter-sawn timber if you intend to make a one-piece neck!

From Wiki:

Quarter Sawn lumber possess advantages over plain sawn lumber because of the orientation of the growth rings. Because the growth rings in quarter-sawn wood run uniformly parallel along the entire board the wood does not shrink and expand with seasonal variation in moisture as much as flat sawn wood. In addition because of the orientation of the growth rings, quarter-sawn wood is less prone to shrinkage, twisting, cupping and in many cases rot because sap wood is easier to isolate in manufacturing process. Purchasing quarter-sawn wood often requires direct contact and contract with the sawyer.
#18
hmmmm....... well You guys have convinced me. thanks for the input. I Guess i will Do that. I will post a pic tommorrow so you guys can help me determine if it is quarter sawn or not!