#1
Dirk Edit:

SPOILER ALERT


ok so i watched this movie last night and it was cool until the last 15 minutes. wtf happened? did lewelyn die? and what the hell was the sherriff talking about in the end when he was telling his dream? was that relevant to anything?
Last edited by Dirk Gently at May 12, 2008,
#2
The movie really isn't about Shugar and Llewelyn...it's about the sherriff, and that he tried to do the right thing but just doesn't care any more because the world is no longer meant for people like him. Hence the movie title. The movie is a lot more deep and artsy than the bloodbath violence makes it out to be.
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#3
That was one of the dumbest movies I ever saw.
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#4
Quote by Jackal58
That was one of the dumbest movies I ever saw.


Really? You've not seen that many movies then. I thought it was one of the best, and most intelligently directed/shot/filmed movies I've seen. The ending confused me, but unlike most films, actually made me think.
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#5
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Really? You've not seen that many movies then. I thought it was one of the best, and most intelligently directed/shot/filmed movies I've seen. The ending confused me, but unlike most films, actually made me think.

You're right I don't see a lot of movies. Most of them are dumb. And the end made me think too. It made me think "WTF" was that supposed to be.
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#6
I thought it was cool and I had to watch it twice to really get the ending, but I loved it. The thing at the end is like Dirk Gently said. I liked the part where the guy said that he had to kill the wife because he promised and the coin thing.
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#7
that movie was a pretty good flick
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#8
i really liked this film. best bad guy ive seen for ages.
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#9
You guys really should read the book. Cormac McCarthy, who wrote it, is easily my favorite writer and NCFOM does not even compare to some of his other works, especially Blood Meridian and The Crossing.

The main idea presented in NCFOM is that as generations progress and get older, they slowly begin to realize that their time at the top is over, and they must past the torch to the new, younger generation. Sheriff Bell is amazed at the pure horror that is Anton Chigurh, and how he can kill mercilessly and have no remorse for any of his actions. This can also be seen at the end of the film when Bell talks to the other law officer and the officer mentions how he can't believe how us kids can have "bolts in our nose and have purple hair." The older generations can't grasp the new ideals and values of the newer generations, but Bell does at the end and retires, symbolizing his "giving of the torch."

As for Llewelyn Moss, he's just the guy caught in between the two generations. He isn't old enough to be part of Bell's generation, but is still not apart of the Chigurh revolution. He really is just the guy who gets caught up in the middle and ends up dying for it. The money bag he carries represents the power of the generation, and he's too oblivious to realize it. That's why it's inevitable that Chigurh walks off with the money, and that his generation is now in power.

The reason why Chirgurh gets injured without any real warning is because of the fast transition of power. His generation is the one on top, so now they are responsible for all of society and must face the consequences.

The title pretty much sums up all I said, as the world we live in doesn't have a place for the previous generations. It's all about who has the larger stick, and the old men's prime has far passed. Thus, it is indeed No Country for Old Men.

The book is better than the movie, but the Coen brothers really did it justice. The film was one of the best I've seen in a few years. If you read the book it can help tie up some loose ends around the end of the film. Cormac McCarthy is a genius!
#11
Quote by Jackal58
That was one of the dumbest movies I ever saw.

I thought you'd understand it more cos you're older. Apparantly not.

I'll find something I posted in the other No Country thread I made.

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After looking on the imdb forums, I have found comments that sum up the film, perfectly to me:

In No Country, Anton is not specifically a psychopathic hired killer, he is Death or our mortality at the cost of living- whichever way you want to put it. At the very beginning of the movie, when Anton pulls over the civilian using the stolen police cruiser, he holds the cattle killing device up to the man's forehead and says "Hold still", before he kills him. The scene cuts immediately to Llewelyn Moss hunting and he gets one of the antelope in the cross hairs of his rifle scope and says "Hold still", before he shoots it. There is no dialog at all in between those identical expressions from two different characters, in different locations, killing two different "animals". That is the establishment of the duality of Death being handed out to humans the same way its handed out to other living things. Another facet of the story aligning the condition of Death shared alike by humans and animals is the fact that Anton kills people with a device intended to kill cattle.
Another indication of this encompassing theme are the two trees Llewelyn comes across when he finds the money after walking away from the carnage of the drug shootout where, its important to note, he left a man to die. So as he's searching for the "ultimo hombre", the last man standing, he comes across the man slumped against a tree trunk. The tree that the man is sitting under is the tree of death and the other tree is the tree of life.
When Anton meets with the "management" at the shootout site at night, he kills them because they have seen him and they know his capacity as a hired killer. You can't see Death and return. (The only people that get to see Anton and live, are the people that don't know that he is a killer.)
When Carson Wells is answering questions from the business man about what Anton is like, Wells says , "Compared to what, the Black Plague?" also known as "the Black Death."
When Carson is talking to Llewelyn in the hospital about Anton, he offers to give him some of the money if he returns it and Llewelyn says that if he was going to cut a deal, he would just make the deal with Anton. Carson answers that Anton doesn't make deals, he says "he has principals that rise above money and drugs and all of that stuff." Of course, you can't make a deal with Death for all the money in the world.
Then, when Llewelyn calls Carson's hotel room just after Anton has killed Carson, Anton says that he is going to go to Odessa, implying that he is going to go kill Llewelyn's wife. Llewelyn says she's not there and Anton says he's still going. Llewelyn gets frustrated and says "If she's not there then why the hell are you going?" Anton says, "It doesn't matter where she is." At this point, Anton is embodying Carla Jeans mortality. He is her Death and he will find her whether she's in Odessa or not. (Just as Death will find all of us no matter where we go.) As he promised Llewelyn, and as we've all been promised, Anton finds Carla Jean to kill her. He asks her to flip the coin to save herself, which she refuses to do and she says that its not the coin, its him thats going to kill her. He says "I got here the same way the coin did." That is, as Death, he is as helpless and at the mercy of the nature of life as we are. He has to kill because we all have to die. The coin is, as he says, "the best I can do" to postpone the inevitable but he can't stop it. She also says to Anton the same thing that Wells said: "You don't have to do this." That's humanities' general lament about our ever pending mortality. Anybody who's old enough to know that they will die one day has had that thought in one form or another.
Our final indication of Anton's purpose, as well as his inculpability, is the car crash at the end when the driver that t-bones him is killed. Anton is hurt, he pays a price in his role as Death, but he walks away. When he says to the boys, "I was gone when you got here." That was true in a two-fold sense. He was gone because the other driver was killed on impact and, in a narrative sense, he was gone because he paid off the kids to say that they hadn't seen him.
Three ancillary points:
A telling piece of dialog between Bell and the other sheriff at the end after they leave the diner where they had coffee. The other sheriff makes reference to "your guy", meaning Chigurh, and says something about him being a "mindless lunatic" and Bell says that he doubts he's "mindless" (I don't think that's the exact word but Bell was negating the assertion that Chigurh was lacking intelligence) and then he says that he's beginning to suspect that Anton Chigurh might actually be "a ghost". This is another clue to Chigurh's status, not as a psychopathic murderer, but simply as humanities fate of mortality. This was already made clear with other clues I already mentioned.
The second minor, yet equally brilliant, piece of writing which portends to the broadest theme of the film is the conversation when Bell and his assistant deputy are sitting having coffee and Bell is reading the article about the couple that has been killing people and burying them in their backyard. His assistant deputy is talking about the Mexicans that were killed in Del Rio and he stumbles over his words when he starts to speak about them as Mexicans in the present tense and he shifts in mid-sentence and uses the past tense. Meaning, his mind gets hung up on whether, after Death, they remain of a particular nationality. Bell looks up over his paper and says "That's the question, isn't it?" i.e.; the question is, does Death level all distinctions that we, as humans, once had while we were among the living?
The third ancillary point I want to make concerns when Bell goes back to the hotel where Moss was killed. We see that Anton Chigurh is in one of the two rooms that is taped off with police tape. Bell steps into the other room. This is completely consistent with a flip of the coin that Chigurh employs a couple of times earlier in the story. The 2 sided coin = the 2 rooms. There is a standard of chance set up in the coin toss and then it is taken out of Chigurh's hands and placed in the decisive move of Bell. This is another indication that the call of the coin, the ultimate call that is, is never truly in the hands of Chigurh. Remember, he "got here the same way the coin did."

Then, in the only ending that there could be, Chigurh, as the personification of Death, walks away. Death can die nor can Death get caught. Finally, the title character, Bell is left to relate two dreams to his wife in his new life as a retiree. The first dream is very short and could be dismissed as irrelevant due to its brevity. But it is crucial, coupled with the second and longer dream, to the act of tying together the movie's universal theme of Death with its narrative constant of the struggle for money.
Bell relates that in his first dream, he's a boy and he goes into town with his father and his father gives him some money to buy something. But he doesn't buy anything and he can't remember what happened to the money, he says "maybe I lost it." This is directly relevant to the chase and all the killing surrounding the money and the fact that Bell never cared about nor tried to get a piece of the $2,000,000. Then, in his second dream, he is in the darkness of a valley and his father passes him with fire in a horn and his father is moving into the darkness ahead and Bell knows that when he gets there in the darkness there will be a fire waiting for him.
The only open ended question in the entire movie is if the light in the darkness is the sign that God has indeed come into Bell's life as he told his friend Ellis(the guy in the wheelchair) he had always expected would be the case as he aged. And did Anton not kill Bell in the literal sense because ,figuratively, Bell isn't going to die in that he's led the kind of life that will allow him the light of an afterlife? Anyhow, that's a question that nobody can answer because once you know the answer, you're already dead.
All this said, though, Bell staying alive is the bone that the Coen's threw to those people who just couldn't stomach such an unconventional story even though every little piece of the story was intricately constructed, works for and establishes a rare amount of cinematic depth, and entertains to the very highest degree while doing so, IMHO.
Everything is answered except that deliberate question of whether or not God stands in the face of Death. I don't think the story or its meaning is open ended or up for debate. It's too specific in too many places to not have a specific intent.

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#12
Quote by Jackal58
That was one of the dumbest movies I ever saw.



+1
#13
Quote by deathbat831
okay apollo minor helped a lot. it makes more sense now. but what do the dreams mean?


Bell's dreams are just his conscious realizations of his concluding time at the top. He sees his father, who is obviously dead, ride past him. Bell continues on and sees his father, who made a fire, and looks as if Bell is welcome to come sit with him at the fire. It signifies that Bell's time is over, and all he really needs to do now is relax and let all that should happen, just happen.

Any other questions, just feel free to ask! I am a McCarthy junkie.
#14
Quote by Dirk Gently
The movie really isn't about Shugar and Llewelyn...it's about the sherriff, and that he tried to do the right thing but just doesn't care any more because the world is no longer meant for people like him. Hence the movie title. The movie is a lot more deep and artsy than the bloodbath violence makes it out to be.


Quote by redh0tchilip3pp
I thought you'd understand it more cos you're older. Apparantly not.

I'll find something I posted in the other No Country thread I made.


I shall watch it again with out the myriad distractions that accompanied the first viewing.
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#15
i personally thought it was very good

however, i did not like the ending. yes, i realise it is meant to leave you thinking, but i would rather watch a film and rely soley on the film, rather than have to look it up after on the internet!

whether this is because i am stupid, or because the film is too ambigious, is an ambigious concept
#16
I watched it twice on the way back home from FL (10 hour flight, left me with time to work it out) and I really enjoyed it... The storyline is great!
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