#1
So I already have a pretty good knowledge of how to use the major scale, but I'd like to become better at it because I know if I am able to use it effectively that I will be able to use every other scale (To some degree or another) effectively. I already have the fretboard memorized, and so of course I know each pattern to the major scale. I can improvise with them all, although if it's a scale I don't use as much it takes me a few run-throughs to the changes down. I've also watched the "Melodic Control" video and apply the lessons in it. Of course, I've done plenty of song writing in the major scale.

I just feel like I could be a lot better at understanding and using it. Hendrix, for example, seemed to see past just notes and patterns, which is obvious from his chordal playing like in little wing.

PS I'm sure someone will suggest this so i'll just say it, I don't want to study modes right now. Although they are the same notes as their major scale, they're completely different.
#2
The best thing I can advice is to spend some time with songs that utilize the Major scale. Study the chord progressions. If there is a solo, study how the solo relates to the chords / chord progression.

You could also study some Major melodies. Even simple nursery rhyme type melodies.

As far as fret-board knowledge:

Now that you know the Major scale all over the neck, maybe you could spend some time learning the "shapes" within those patterns. For instance for any particular Major scale pattern, you could learn the associated Major arpeggio within that pattern.

Major arpeggio/Major scale (pattern 1):



You could also learn all of the related arpeggios, starting on each scale degree, within in that pattern. * No image available.... but its the same idea
#3
You should harmonize the major scale if you don't already. Start practicing with 3rds all over the neck, then 5ths, 7ths, etc, until you get use to using all the different combinations of notes and hearing the intervals. Then you could combine different ones and you have a way to build chords without just memorizing some.
#4
^ Intervals and such are always good to work on.

If you want to learn more about the scale in terms of how it can be organized,
seeing it on the freboard, training your ear, training your fingers ... then Scale
Studies. "Sheets of Sound" is a big book of them. Work on some studies and
it will do all that and more. If you do enough of this type of work, you'll find
a lot of creative ideas live right inside scales that you just need to pull out of them.
#5
Now that you know the Major scale all over the neck, maybe you could spend some time learning the "shapes" within those patterns. For instance for any particular Major scale pattern, you could learn the associated Major arpeggio within that pattern.

Yeah that's definitely something I need to do. i totally forgot about that..
Start practicing with 3rds all over the neck, then 5ths, 7ths, etc, until you get use to using all the different combinations of notes and hearing the intervals. Then you could combine different ones and you have a way to build chords without just memorizing some.

Ok so let me make sure I get what you're saying. If I was harmonizing in thirds in the E major scale and I started on E, it would be E G# F# A F# B and so on right?


If you want to learn more about the scale in terms of how it can be organized,
seeing it on the freboard, training your ear, training your fingers ... then Scale
Studies. "Sheets of Sound" is a big book of them.

What exactly does this book contain?
#7
Quote by Spamwise

Ok so let me make sure I get what you're saying. If I was harmonizing in thirds in the E major scale and I started on E, it would be E G# F# A F# B and so on right?


Well, what it means to harmonize is to play more then one note at once. When you start off it is easier to start working with two at a time and then more after that. So if you are in the E major scale like you said, then you would harmonize with the major and minor thirds for each note depending on whats in the scale: E F# G# A B C# D# .

So it would be: E and G# (maj3), F# and A (min3), G# and B (min3), A and C# (maj3), B and D# (maj3), C# and E (min3), and D# and F#(min3).

Just find these notes together on the fretboard and start ascending and descending down two strings at a time until you get used to the sounds of the intervals. Then do the same with 5ths and 7ths and so on.


Edit: It's actually more common to harmonize in 3rds, 5ths and 6ths instead of 7ths. They don't always sound pleasant.
Last edited by Rudzz34 at May 13, 2008,