#1
Okay so here's the situation...

My band practice in a rehearsal studio in a soundproof room every week and I want to start recording us playing live in the room.

We have guitars amps drums (obviously) and 3 Mics a PA and 2 moniters (cheers edvac!).

What equipment do i need to start recording live at decent quality?
The only thing we could think of is maybe a good mic placed in front of where we play and I record to my computer?

Im a complete amatuer at this so help would really be appreciated. Were on about a £150 ($300) budget

Thanks pit.
Last edited by Conway1991 at May 13, 2008,
#2
get a 4 track recorder and a mac with garage band. also do not refer to the speakers as speakers as they are called moniters.

when using a mic to capture the sound of your amp, the mic should be off center of the speaker coil expiriment to find out what sounds best to you.

you may need another mic or two if you have 2 guitarists. you need one for the kick drum. not the snare as those are usually loud enough, center one on the tom toms. thats it for drums.

just remember if you have your mic close to the amps speakers coils the amp shouldnt be cranked. remember on tube amps the sweet spot is 5-7 on the volume but it all boils down to personal preference.
Last edited by edvac at May 13, 2008,
#3
For £150 it would be much better for you to invest in some studio time. Also, Edvacs advice on a few things is (and maybe in another case) wrong. Are the monitors main PA speakers or used as foldback to hear what is going on? Main vocals I presume. IE speakers on the floor that face up to the player? This is a monitor, and the *maybe* case in the post. His advice on drum micing is purely wrong on the other hand. mic the kick yes, but always mic the snare. This is needed 100%. if you can not stretch your budget to allow *at least* a kick mic, snare mic, one overhead (for cymbals) a guitar track for each guitar and a bass guuitar track, along with vocals then a live recording will never, ever work. Trust me I have been working in Live sound recording for a while now. And am doing Music Production at Leeds College of Music in September.

You also do not need a mac, a 4 track, or garage band. If you can hire out maybe 3 Shure SM57s (snare, guitars) 1 AKG D112 (kick) and a decent small diaphragm condensor then you will get a good sound if you can get hold of a good mixer and an interface allowing you to send *ideally* each of these tracks to a sequencer, audacity and reason are both free and good, then do the vocals after, though at the same time - Shure SM58 is a good place to start for vocals - will work too.

But, as I said, I would look to invest that into real studio time. Especially if you can up it another £100 or so.

but, if you're not overly fussed quality, set up your practice room as you would on stage, get 2 mics, stick them at centre, pointing diagonally outwards, into a pc, for an ok stereo mix. It'll probably sound a bit rubbish, but if your levels are perfect, should sound ok.

If I can be of any other help PM me/ask, I know what I'm talking about.
Quote by TehJermie
you can get that toneblaster stack at the cost of your dignity.

Quote by silhouettica
fine, screw the cheese sandwich if you must...


#5
Quote by hairball
For £150 it would be much better for you to invest in some studio time. Also, Edvacs advice on a few things is (and maybe in another case) wrong. Are the monitors main PA speakers or used as foldback to hear what is going on? Main vocals I presume. IE speakers on the floor that face up to the player? This is a monitor, and the *maybe* case in the post. His advice on drum micing is purely wrong on the other hand. mic the kick yes, but always mic the snare. This is needed 100%. if you can not stretch your budget to allow *at least* a kick mic, snare mic, one overhead (for cymbals) a guitar track for each guitar and a bass guuitar track, along with vocals then a live recording will never, ever work. Trust me I have been working in Live sound recording for a while now. And am doing Music Production at Leeds College of Music in September.

You also do not need a mac, a 4 track, or garage band. If you can hire out maybe 3 Shure SM57s (snare, guitars) 1 AKG D112 (kick) and a decent small diaphragm condensor then you will get a good sound if you can get hold of a good mixer and an interface allowing you to send *ideally* each of these tracks to a sequencer, audacity and reason are both free and good, then do the vocals after, though at the same time - Shure SM58 is a good place to start for vocals - will work too.

But, as I said, I would look to invest that into real studio time. Especially if you can up it another £100 or so.

but, if you're not overly fussed quality, set up your practice room as you would on stage, get 2 mics, stick them at centre, pointing diagonally outwards, into a pc, for an ok stereo mix. It'll probably sound a bit rubbish, but if your levels are perfect, should sound ok.

If I can be of any other help PM me/ask, I know what I'm talking about.



PM him, hes right. With three mics, run different tracks, recording the drums with all 3 mics, then do the bass, guitar(s), then vox.

It might be a good idea to grab some headphones too. Do your guitarists have pods? like processors? Because with my band, the bass, the two guitars, and the vocals go right into the board using our pods. So we lay down the drum track, and play our guitars while hearing the drums in our headsets
SUBSCRIBE!

Gibson SG faded, black hardware/ EMG81-89
peavey 6505+
GMajor Effects Processor
BBE 362 sonic maximizer
THD Hotplate
Avatar 2x12 w/ Hellatone 60/ K100
Behringer FB1010
#6
Computer mic + Audacity
That's how my band recoreded. Before the mic input on my bassist's computer stopped working.
#7
Quote by hairball
For £150 it would be much better for you to invest in some studio time. Also, Edvacs advice on a few things is (and maybe in another case) wrong. Are the monitors main PA speakers or used as foldback to hear what is going on? Main vocals I presume. IE speakers on the floor that face up to the player? This is a monitor, and the *maybe* case in the post. His advice on drum micing is purely wrong on the other hand. mic the kick yes, but always mic the snare. This is needed 100%. if you can not stretch your budget to allow *at least* a kick mic, snare mic, one overhead (for cymbals) a guitar track for each guitar and a bass guuitar track, along with vocals then a live recording will never, ever work. Trust me I have been working in Live sound recording for a while now. And am doing Music Production at Leeds College of Music in September.

You also do not need a mac, a 4 track, or garage band. If you can hire out maybe 3 Shure SM57s (snare, guitars) 1 AKG D112 (kick) and a decent small diaphragm condensor then you will get a good sound if you can get hold of a good mixer and an interface allowing you to send *ideally* each of these tracks to a sequencer, audacity and reason are both free and good, then do the vocals after, though at the same time - Shure SM58 is a good place to start for vocals - will work too.

But, as I said, I would look to invest that into real studio time. Especially if you can up it another £100 or so.

but, if you're not overly fussed quality, set up your practice room as you would on stage, get 2 mics, stick them at centre, pointing diagonally outwards, into a pc, for an ok stereo mix. It'll probably sound a bit rubbish, but if your levels are perfect, should sound ok.

If I can be of any other help PM me/ask, I know what I'm talking about.



i was just offering advice on my past personal experiences. my drummer being a loud drummer. and with his snare just under the middle tom tom we never had to mic the snare