Page 1 of 2
#3
Quote by :-D
The E9 contains a seventh (D), the Eadd9 does not.

E9: E G# B D F#
Eadd9: E G# B F#


/thread

that's also the way it is with add11 add 13 etc

it'll have a root, third and fifth

but once you get to 11, 13, you can just add the second and fourth and six, etc.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#4
Quote by TDKshorty
/thread

that's also the way it is with add11 add 13 etc

it'll have a root, third and fifth

but once you get to 11, 13, you can just add the second and fourth and six, etc.


IIRC, isn't "Xadd 13" just a convoluted way to say "X6?"

I thought the only add chords were "add 9" and "add 11"
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#5
Quote by seedmole
IIRC, isn't "Xadd 13" just a convoluted way to say "X6?"

I thought the only add chords were "add 9" and "add 11"

If no seventh is present, it's a 6 and not a 13, yes.
#6
I said that.


or at least I meant it
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#7
sweet, i answered the question in my brain before i came in here and sure enough i was right! i think i've mentioned before i have bad memory and am sometimes awful with naming chords.
#9
Quote by :-D
If no seventh is present, it's a 6 and not a 13, yes.


even if it's the highest pitched note being played?
#10
Quote by farcry
even if it's the highest pitched note being played?

The sixth is always the highest note of a sixth chord. For example, a C E G A is C6; put that A in the bass and you're playing either C/A or Am7 depending on the context. Do something like C A E G or C E A G and you'd probably notate them as slash chords.
#11
Quote by :-(
If no seventh is present, it's a 6 and not a 13, yes.
*technically* an 11th and a 9th needs to be present too. But thats *technically*. I sure as hell wouldnt play an 11th or a 9th if I was given that chord, it'd be way to difficult to play. I only have 6 fingers.
Last edited by demonofthenight at May 14, 2008,
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
*technically* an 11th and a 9th needs to be present too. But thats *technically*. I sure as hell wouldnt play an 11th or a 9th if I was given that chord, it'd be way to difficult to play. I only have 6 fingers.

In classical notation, yes. In jazz notation (more practical for guitarists), this is incorrect.

Why did you make my name a sad face?
#16
Quote by :^0
In classical notation, yes. In jazz notation (more practical for guitarists), this is incorrect.

Why did you make my name a sad face?
I know, I dont even play fifths in some of my chords because it's too hard.
#18
Quote by :-}
At the risk of embarrassing myself, I dare say you are having too much fun with my face.
O rly?
#19
Eadd13 and E6 are kind of the same, the Eadd13 should have the 6th but in an octave from the root.
#21
Quote by branny1982
Hmm. I don't know about this. I beleive that relating the use of 2/9 4/11 6/13 to their position in octaves is not right.

I think 2 and 4 are only used in sus chords and 6 is only used in '6'chords.


+1

And I like this new smiley-naming-system. It makes me laugh.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#22
Quote by branny1982
Hmm. I don't know about this. I beleive that relating the use of 2/9 4/11 6/13 to their position in octaves is not right.

I think 2 and 4 are only used in sus chords and 6 is only used in '6'chords.

No, I've seen add2 chords in my jazz charts, for example. It usually has more to do with any extensions a chord has beyond the basic triad.
Quote by seedmole
And I like this new smiley-naming-system. It makes me laugh.

#23
Quote by ;-D


Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#25
Quote by branny1982
Hmm. I don't know about this. I beleive that relating the use of 2/9 4/11 6/13 to their position in octaves is not right.

I think 2 and 4 are only used in sus chords and 6 is only used in '6'chords.


No, a true 13th chord will have the 9th and 11th. It sounds a little funny but a 13th chord is pretty far stretched out.

Also Eadd13 just seems like bad grammar to me but I don't know.
Build a man a fire and you keep him warm for a day.
Catch a man on fire and you keep him warm for the rest of his life.
Last edited by J3lademaster at May 14, 2008,
#26
Quote by J3lademaster
No, a true 13th chord will have the 9th and 11th. It sounds a little funny but a 13th chord is pretty far stretched out.

Also Eadd13 just seems like bad grammar to me but I don't know.


You can voice a "true" 13th chord without the 9th and 11th.
#27
Hmm, it's been a while since I've taken music theory. Maybe I'm wrong...

I'm sure that's the reasoning for calling an Eadd13 an Eadd13. If you could have a true or pure E13 without the 9th and 11th then why would you have to change the name? If you say E13 you have to include all the degrees of the chord up to the 13th. I thought this was right but maybe not.

I'm talking music theory not guitar theory. I think guitarists leave out notes of the chords all the time because of fingering issues.

Also, I think that the reasoning for saying Eadd13 and not saying E6 is simply because you are to play the octave of the 6th and not the 6th because you get less disonance out of the octave (13th) than you would the 6th.
Build a man a fire and you keep him warm for a day.
Catch a man on fire and you keep him warm for the rest of his life.
Last edited by J3lademaster at May 14, 2008,
#28
Quote by J3lademaster
If you say E13 you have to include all the degrees of the chord up to the 13th. I thought this was right but maybe not.


No, you dont have to have them all in there. its actually more common to not include them all. You have the right idea about how a 13th chord is constructed, its just that in common practice, its not usually voiced that way. On the guitar, its never voiced that way.
#29
Hmm, ok thanks.
Build a man a fire and you keep him warm for a day.
Catch a man on fire and you keep him warm for the rest of his life.
#30
Quote by J3lademaster
Also, I think that the reasoning for saying Eadd13 and not saying E6 is simply because you are to play the octave of the 6th and not the 6th because you get less disonance out of the octave (13th) than you would the 6th.


As far as I know, the octave spacing of the notes has no importance in the naming of a chord, so long as the lowest note being played is the root (Otherwise, they are designated as inversions of the original chord, or slash chords depending on who you're talking to). The position in terms of octaves of the notes within a chord other than the bass note has no regard to the naming of something.
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
#31
I've been doing some research and you guys are all correct. I just had to sort it out for myself. Sorry for making more confusion. It's been a while since I've studied theory.

It just depends on if you have the 7th in the chord or not which was answered by smiley satch, :-( >:-o :^0 :-} ;-D I mean , in the first reply. To be more clear. the 9th, 11th, and 13th are only called by those names if the chord has the 7th degree otherwise they are add9, add11, and add13.

Furthermore, while we're on the subject of chords, sus2 and sus4 chords include the 2nd or 4th of the scale respectively, but they both omit the 3rd of the scale. (scale from the root of the chord of course)

Correct me if I'm wrong, I'm still trying to sort out some of this myself but I'm fairly sure this is correct.
Build a man a fire and you keep him warm for a day.
Catch a man on fire and you keep him warm for the rest of his life.
Last edited by J3lademaster at Jun 11, 2008,
#32
Quote by J3lademaster
I've been doing some research and you guys are all correct. I just had to sort it out for myself. Sorry for making more confusion. It's been a while since I've studied theory.

It just depends on if you have the 7th in the chord or not which was answered by smiley satch :-( >:-o :^0 :-} ;-D I mean "" in the first reply. To be more clear. the 9th, 11th, and 13th are only called by those names if the chord has the 7th degree otherwise they are add9, add11, and add13.

Furthermore, while we're on the subject of chords, sus2 and sus4 chords include the 2nd or 4th of the scale respectively, but they both omit the 3rd of the scale. (scale from the root of the chord of course)

Correct me if I'm wrong, I'm still trying to sort out some of this myself but I'm fairly sure this is correct.

I can't figure out my name now.

The only thing you have to realize is that your second paragraph refers to classical notation. If you're playing a jazz chart and see a thirteenth chord (not add13, just X13), then 1 3 b7 13 would be the way to play it. It's just easier to notate this way and includes the most important notes of the chord.
#33
More to chew on. Thanks :-D
Build a man a fire and you keep him warm for a day.
Catch a man on fire and you keep him warm for the rest of his life.
Last edited by J3lademaster at Jun 11, 2008,
#35
Ok, I think I see what your saying. Essentially it's the same as what I said. You just omitted the 5th. But the chord is called an X13 not an Xadd13 because it still has the 7th in the chord.
Build a man a fire and you keep him warm for a day.
Catch a man on fire and you keep him warm for the rest of his life.
#36
Quote by J3lademaster
Ok, I think I see what your saying. Essentially it's the same as what I said. You just omitted the 5th. But the chord is called an X13 not an Xadd13 because it still has the 7th in the chord.

The ninth and eleventh are omitted as well, but the four most important notes remain.
#37
yea, just remember that for extending the chord a 7th is necessary. if no 7 then you're just adding to the chord.

a 13 chord is spelled (1-3-5-b7-9-11-13) with 7 notes in it. do you really think you could play 7 notes simultaneously on the guitar? you obviously have to omit some. in this case the key notes to try and hang onto are the Root, the 3rd (to keep the quality), the b7 (to maintain that it is an extension) and the 13. after that it's basically personal choice.

EDIT: :-D is good times.
#38
Quote by :-3
The ninth and eleventh are omitted as well, but the four most important notes remain.
Just to expand on what smiley has said...
The only notes I dont omit from a chord are the root, third, seventh and the last note of the chord (if its a X13 chord, it will be the 13, if its a X9 chord its the 9 and so on).
You can omit the root, on occasions, but it's something I'd only do if there was another rhthym instrument in the band.
Basically play as many notes as possible, but omit if it makes the chord easier to play.
#39
Quote by demonofthenight
*technically* an 11th and a 9th needs to be present too. But thats *technically*. I sure as hell wouldnt play an 11th or a 9th if I was given that chord, it'd be way to difficult to play. I only have 6 fingers.


Hey, you've got us beat.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#40
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Hey, you've got us beat.


O_o

Intrigue?!
Strat / SH-201 -> DOD Mixer -> ZVex Mastotron -> Fulltone Clyde -> BYOC OD II -> Ibanez FLL -> VS Chorus -> DOD FX 96 -> Boss DD-6 -> MXR 10-Band EQ -> Boss RC-2 -> Stereo Mixer -> Alesis PicoVerb -> Peavey Delta Blues 210/Yamaha Fifty112
Page 1 of 2