#1
Okay so I'm no stranger to intervals and I have known what they are for quite some time but recently my music thoery-wise friend told me it would be good to memorize each and every interval by ear.

But how does one play any two notes, any space apart, on the fret board and pin-point exactly what interval they are in... by EAR?!?.

discuss.
Quote by Overlord
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#3
how does one know the root one from two notes?
Quote by Overlord
It's not hard to be nice, but it's nice to be hard
#4
This is precisely what I am trying to do myself. Though I cannot give you expert advice, as I cannot identify every interval without a few mistakes, I'll say that each interval has a distinct and unique sound from every other interval. I do not think it is necessary to know what the root note is in any scale. Though if you know what scale a melody is in, that can only help.

Every minor second has a specific sound. Every major third has a specific sound. Or, in guitar frets, if you play a note, and then play a note one fret up, no matter what note it is, it will have that unique "minor second" (aka one fret difference, A to A#) sound. Do the same with another random note, and move up four frets (ex. A to C#), or two whole steps, aka a "major third." Play a major third interval from any random note, and you will begin to recognize the distinct sound of a major third, no matter what the starting note is.

Also, do not limit yourself to memorizing intervals going up notes. Practice identifying intervals going down also. (ex. A to Ab / G# as a minor second lower)

But once again, I am unable to identify every interval without errors myself, so I would like some advice on this too. I'll be practicing this much more once my classes end for the semester. BTW, that ear training game seems like great practice.
#5
Here's an example of something I was attempting the other day. Play a note, then sing the note you are going to play next before you play it. So, play the C on the 3rd fret, A string. Now, sing what you think the D (5th fret) will sound like. Or hum, whatever, doesn't matter as long as you have some sort of pitch in your head of what you think it will be. Then play the note to see if you are right. Try doing this for all different intervals (C to E, C to F#, C to the C one octave higher, etc) through the entire octave (and even beyond if you're good).
#6
musictheory.net has this interval ear trainer
it plays two notes, and you just click on what the interval is
apart from that, just going through the scale, maybe trying to hum the note to yourself, whatever works for you
yeah, i've got gear too...
squier strat
squier tele
Ibanez rg4ex
Boss DS-1
Morely Bad Horsie Wah
Digitech Hot Head
Boss GE-7
Zoom G1X
Mesa Boogie 5:50 Express
Vox AD50vt
#7
Quote by Carnivean
Okay so I'm no stranger to intervals and I have known what they are for quite some time but recently my music thoery-wise friend told me it would be good to memorize each and every interval by ear.

But how does one play any two notes, any space apart, on the fret board and pin-point exactly what interval they are in... by EAR?!?.

discuss.


In ear training class we learned to recognize them by singing them.

another trick for learning to recognize them is associating them with familiar songs.
for instance a P5 is the 1st to notes to the star wars theme. A P4 is the 1st 2 notes from Here comes the bride. You can come up with something for each interval.

- Practice singing the various intervals, both ascending and descending.

- test yourself with something like that interval trainer from music theory.net
#8
Quote by Dwardom
Its pretty easy to do actually.
Know the root note
and run up the scale in your head
You will find out what degree the interval is that way
Heres a practice game
http://8notes.com/school/theory/musictheory/files/trainers/html/id90_en.html

Awsum, I was looking for something like this also