#2
Quote by Skullmage4
What is a free way to develop perfect pitch? I've been playing for four and a half years.

Choir helped me immensely. It was a couple of years ago that I began to associate pitches with specific words that we were singing, and I was able to recall certain pitches based on remembering the word that each pitch was associated with. I kept doing this for every pitch I came across, and it came fairly slowly but eventually I developed spot-on perfect pitch.
#3
Your born with perfect pitch.

You gain relative pitch through practice.
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#4
^Perfect pitch refers to the ability to correctly think of and name a note without external reference. I was not born with this but am able to do so now.
#5
Quote by :-D
^Perfect pitch refers to the ability to correctly think of and name a note without external reference. I was not born with this but am able to do so now.
No, you can't learn it. You have relative pitch through practise. It's essentially the same thing, just one is learnt, the other isn't.
#6
Quote by sadistic_monkey
No, you can't learn it. You have relative pitch through practise. It's essentially the same thing, just one is learnt, the other isn't.


+1
#7
Quote by sadistic_monkey
No, you can't learn it. You have relative pitch through practise. It's essentially the same thing, just one is learnt, the other isn't.

This is often debated anyway, and I see no reason to say that it can't be learnt when it's the same exact ability that those who are born with it have.
#8
Quote by sadistic_monkey
No, you can't learn it. You have relative pitch through practise. It's essentially the same thing, just one is learnt, the other isn't.


How is that relative at all?


Listen to the descriptors -- perfect (aka absolute) pitch vs relative pitch

If he can do it without having a reference point (hearing another note that he knows the pitch of) how would it be anything but perfect pitch?

Here's what I get out of it.

perfect pitch - you can hear a note the instant you wake up/come out of a coma/whatever and say with accuracy the name of the note, or you could wake up and say I wanna sing a Bb and hit it spot on (as long as it's not from feeling the vibrations in your throat)

relative pitch - you recognize the interval from the previous note and can tell what the note is because of that. ex. using a pitch pipe and then singing a D.


This is from what I've researched a bit because I'm looking into learning this.
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#9
honest question: how can you be born with the ability to associate a musical note with a letter? just curious..
#10
Quote by hokiecmo
If he can do it without having a reference point (hearing another note that he knows the pitch of) how would it be anything but perfect pitch?


i think the point is hes referencing something he already knows (a song, for example). just because its not played at that moment doesnt mean he is not using it as a reference. whereas perfect pitch exists regardless, which i find really hard to explain. im not sure such a thing exists (without being learned), but since we're theorizing...

either way, technicalities aside (they dont really matter anyway)... itd be nice to have perfect pitch, and at the same time it would suck. anything slightly off would be incredibly annoying. on another note, the irony of this is that perfect pitch is relative... to the culture.