#1
Hypothetical chord progression:

Amin -> Dmin -> E7 -> Amin

i - iv - V - i

In theory, the E7 should resolve down to A minor:

E --> E
G# -> A
B --> C
D --> E

However, wouldnt it resolve better if Emaj7 was used:

E --> E
G# --> A
B --> C
D# --> E

Wouldnt the D# here want to resolve a lot more strongly than the b7 in the dominant chord?

Edit:

Im ignoring the fact that A minor has no D#.... Im thinking along the lines of going from A minor into Eminor somewhere along the line, howerver, I just want to know what is better really, and what is classically allowed.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#2
E7 Am (V - i) is a very common lick in a minor key.

The reason Emaj7 isn't used is because the dom7 chord creates a great deal of tension which allows for the exotic harmonic minor scale (A harm minor over E7) to be used effectively. The tension also leads to a good resolution.


PS-Nothing is allowed or forbidded in music, except when it comes to naming.
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
E7 Am (V - i) is a very common lick in a minor key.

The reason Emaj7 isn't used is because the dom7 chord creates a great deal of tension which allows for the exotic harmonic minor scale (A harm minor over E7) to be used effectively. The tension also leads to a good resolution.


PS-Nothing is allowed or forbidded in music, except when it comes to naming.


I can see how the tension leads to better resolution, I just assumed making the interval gap from D -> E to D# -> E would create a better resolution.

Listening to the chord though, its the dominant chord that gives the better resolution so its b7 -> tonic basically which gives the tension and release?
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#4
Quote by Guitardude19
I can see how the tension leads to better resolution, I just assumed making the interval gap from D -> E to D# -> E would create a better resolution.

Listening to the chord though, its the dominant chord that gives the better resolution so its b7 -> tonic basically which gives the tension and release?


With the dominant 7th you have a tritone between the 7th and the 3rd of the V chord. The 7th (D in your example) resolves down to the 3rd of the tonic, while the 3rd (G# in your example and the "leading tone") resolves up to the root of the tonic.

this is standard procedure.
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Where are you getting the b7 from?


Hey I didnt even put b7 what are talking about?

edit: Oh the TS NM

he is talking about the b7 of the dominant chord. D is the b7 of an E7 chord.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 14, 2008,
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
With the dominant 7th you have a tritone between the 7th and the 3rd of the V chord. The 7th (D in your example) resolves down to the 3rd of the tonic, while the 3rd (G# in your example and the "leading tone") resolves up to the root of the tonic.

this is standard procedure.


Makes sense now... My theory is so rusty... I havent looked at it for a year.

Thanks!

Quote by bangoodcharlote
TS: Where are you getting the b7 from?


Ah sorry I meant the b7 from the dominant chord.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#9
Quote by Guitardude19
Makes sense now... My theory is so rusty... I havent looked at it for a year.

Thanks!


Ah sorry I meant the b7 from the dominant chord.



NP, glad to help.

Your b7 made perfect sense btw.
#10
The b7 resolves down to the three. The 7th in a dominant chord more or less always resolves down.
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
With the dominant 7th you have a tritone between the 7th and the 3rd of the V chord. The 7th (D in your example) resolves down to the 3rd of the tonic, while the 3rd (G# in your example and the "leading tone") resolves up to the root of the tonic.

this is standard procedure.


Spot on. Tritones are the name of the game. You beat me to it in this thread ! = ]