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#1
sooo i want to buy my very first bass. i was thinking to take this peavey http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Peavey-Millennium-BXP-4String-Bass-Guitar?sku=511369
who is in the top 10 of the best beginner basses
and this amp
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Peavey-MAX-110-Bass-Combo?sku=481447
but i was wondering if it would be better to take it in 4 or 5 strings model considering i am a absolute beginner?
#2
depends on the music you play. the main types that really prefer a fiver would be Hip hop, rap, so on. however, many variations of metal work better with fives. I'd go with a four unless you want to be playing a lot of metal or hip hop
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Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

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#3
well actually i was planing playing metal... but is it more dificult to learn to play on a 5 string bass?
#4
Fives give you more notes to play on and you can go a lot lower than fours.
But having the low B will probably be pretty confusing for a beginner.
Especially looking at tabs and stuff. Because most bass tabs are EADG unless noted.
Quote by gallagher2006
Whats a Steve Vai? Floyd Rose ripoff?

Quote by Mr. Twelve
Behold...the Arctopus are obviously music. I don't see how anyone could say they're not music compared to many modern and post-modern composers. That being said, I think B...tA are terrible.
#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
The weapon of choice for metal players is five strings or more.

not really, a lot of metal players just get 4 strings and de-tune like a bitch :p

yyou can just get more speed off a 4 i gues, although Ibanez style necks are nice and fast too.
#8
If it's your first bass then I would recommend a 4-string. It's just enough to cover all genres of music and satisfy anyone while still being able enough cover for your metal influences.

I'm speaking from the same stand point, as I originally came into bass wanting to primarily play metal, and I still stick to 4 string to this day after a few a years of playing. Once you learn each of your notes and get the feel for all of your strings and the entire fretboard, you could move onto a 5-string.

Of course I might seem biased but I never heard or met anyone that started on a 5 string bass, but I'm open for correction and enlightenment.
#9
Quote by glendoom
If it's your first bass then I would recommend a 4-string. It's just enough to cover all genres of music and satisfy anyone while still being able enough cover for your metal influences.

I'm speaking from the same stand point, as I originally came into bass wanting to primarily play metal, and I still stick to 4 string to this day after a few a years of playing. Once you learn each of your notes and get the feel for all of your strings and the entire fretboard, you could move onto a 5-string.

Of course I might seem biased but I never heard or met anyone that started on a 5 string bass, but I'm open for correction and enlightenment.

My first bass wasn't a 5 string, but I started to take the instrument seriously when I got my five (a few months after I started playing)
(long story short, my first bass was somewhat broken and I didn't have motivation to play. I planned on buying a more operational bass as soon as I could (a few months later)

I don't understand how tabs would be harder to read, you just would "skip" the bottom string.
#10
it is not harder to learn on five. you don't have to use the extra string. I know this weirdo who uses a five string so she can rest her finger on the extra string. for her, I guess, it's actually easier. the only difference is neck circumference, which hasn't stopped Billy Sheehan...(he uses a 4 stringer, but those necks on his yamahas are sorta thick.)
also palmer, you can delete your post. just hit edit, then delete.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#12
I started off thinking the same thing. I went with the four but, I was regretting it later on when I wanted a fiver and had no money at all.

If I were you, Id go with the Five. If you love metal like I do, you'll want it sooner or later.
#13
Just get four. When your more experienced you can decide whether or not you need the extra string
#15
4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4,


that's four.
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#16
I would say 4, five strings is just a added thing, You certainly don't NEED it, despite what people are saying, i think 4 is still THE bass.
#17
I started on a five and I'd never voluntarily go back to a four for my main style of music. It's like this: you get a four string, learn to play bass, you're set. You get a five later, then have to re-learn with the extra string. OR You get a five string, learn to play bass with all five and only four strings, then you've saved time and money.
Millie, my Peavey Grind Fiver
Peavey BAM 210 350w combo amp
Sansamp Bass Driver DI
Modded Ernie Ball VP Jr.
Monster Bass Cable, 21'

Quote by NakedBassist
Welcome to bass, you'll f*cking love it
#18
My first bass was a 5-string, an Alvarez AEB-5. Excellent bass.
"Comedy's a dead art form. Now tragedy, that's funny." -Bender Bending Rodriguez
#19
The extra strings do not make it harder. However, it may make it more uncomfortable. Some people never leave a 4 string, because a 5 string just never feel right. For others (like me), 5 and 6 string basses feel perfectly natural.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
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Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
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+1
#21
I'd go to some stores if I were you, and try out some low-end (pardon the pun) basses, in both 4 and 5 to see which one feels right to you. Internet buying is never advised for a first bass, as it should feel "right" for you, not from what others say.

EDIT: But Warwick Rockbasses are well made for a starter instrument
Quote by denizenz
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Gear:
Washburn T14 B
Laney RB-1
#22
I have never owned a 5-er but I've ran into lots of situations where I'd like to get lower than the E temporarily. Even playing old gospel hymns at church, you can get a different sound out of a 5-er because when you're playing a back and forth root-7th oom-pah pattern, you can just hit one string higher on the same fret as the root note because it is actually the 7th, just one octave down. So, if it's valid for old gospel hymns, I seriously doubt that it is specific for only certain genre's. I do think it would be weird for a total beginner though, a 4 string is just the standard. I think relying on the top string of a 5-er too early would just make for a mushy sloppy sound.
#23
Quote by corndogggy
I have never owned a 5-er but I've ran into lots of situations where I'd like to get lower than the E temporarily. Even playing old gospel hymns at church, you can get a different sound out of a 5-er because when you're playing a back and forth root-7th oom-pah pattern, you can just hit one string higher on the same fret as the root note because it is actually the 7th, just one octave down. So, if it's valid for old gospel hymns, I seriously doubt that it is specific for only certain genre's. I do think it would be weird for a total beginner though, a 4 string is just the standard. I think relying on the top string of a 5-er too early would just make for a mushy sloppy sound.

Wouldn't it be the bottom string?

Anyways, to this thread, what about hi-C 5ers. I've never played one myself
#24
i say what most of the other guys are saying, start with a four and move on from there, and like about 2 snap said you should try it out and see how it feels as apposed to just buying it off the internet.

I've never played a five before but i reallyyy want to
#25
I really think you need to play the basses and decide what bass is best for you. If you are an absolute beginner, meaning you have never played guitar or bass and you have no "chops" then a 5string will definately be harder to learn on than a 4 string. But if you have do have the chops then there is little difference between a 4 string and a 5 string. Im sure people will argue but its all about how you go about learning on one. A lot of people argue you dont need the B string, but it does give you a few more notes like Eb and Db that you cant get on a 4 string, and stay in the bass clef.

I would say, go to your guitar store and play get the bass that plays the best for you. I have that peavey that your are asking about and it is awesome and has fantastic playability due to its jazz neck. As for the rockbass, ive played many of them and i love them but feel out what you like cause if you get a bass you dont like, youll never play it.
#26
Quote by the humanity
it is not harder to learn on five. you don't have to use the extra string. I know this weirdo who uses a five string so she can rest her finger on the extra string. for her, I guess, it's actually easier. the only difference is neck circumference, which hasn't stopped Billy Sheehan...(he uses a 4 stringer, but those necks on his yamahas are sorta thick.)
also palmer, you can delete your post. just hit edit, then delete.


She could just buy a thumb rest.
Quote by brandooon
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#27
yea okay but like how could i see what is best for me if i have never played bass before?
and if its so important to try the bass before buying it, why do so manny people recommend starter packages like de one that ibanez do?
Last edited by cyberrem at May 15, 2008,
#28
Quote by Woogles
She could just buy a thumb rest.

she's anal about mods. she got all worried when I put a happy face sticker on mine.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#29
I'd get a 5 string because you'll probably start wanting more range on your bass eventually and if you don't like it, just take the B string off and you've got a 4 string.
#30
i wouldnt suggest just takeing the string off, it will really bow the neck and ruin the action.
Definately not a good thing to do...
#32
Quote by cyberrem
okay, i have found this bass http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/RockBass-by-Warwick-Streamer-Standard-4String-Bass?sku=519098
used for 120$ i whant to know what u guys think about it


i tried one 2 days ago
nice bass if you like metal
the tone a bit muddy for my taste
but overall ir was a great quality bass just not for everyone
My Gear

Squier VM p-bass(i chosed it over a fender!!!) with quarter pounder and gotoh 201!!
fender MIM P bass
epiphone SG 400
#33
I got into a long discussion of this with my friend, and this is what we decided

4 String Pros
-less strings to worry about
-strings have more room between them for slapping
-easier access to G string

4 String Cons
-smaller range
-slower access to certain notes

5 String Pros
-Larger range
-more strings for slap bassing
-less area between strings (can be a pro or con, depends on your playing style)

5 String Cons
-less access to higher notes
-larger bridge (yet again, depends on playing style)

pretty much, we decided that really just depends on the person. If you are a beginner, it is easier to stay with the same model you start with (start with a 4 stringer, keep using a 4 stringer) because differant basses require differant playing styles.

Personally, I would perfer a 5 string, because its easier to switch strings
~Insert Signature Here~
#34
I'd go to some stores if I were you, and try out some low-end (pardon the pun) basses, in both 4 and 5 to see which one feels right to you.
Yeah, I did this when I bought my first bass. And 4 strings was WAY too few, while 5 seemed a lot better, these being my choices. Took me about 3 months to realize 5 wasn't enough - I was constantly running out of strings when I tried to produce a decent bass line.

(Now, granted, if your idea of a decent bass line is to play very low-pitched roots and 5ths on downbeats, and never use any fills, chords, runs or the like, you might do perfectly well with two strings. But these will usually be B and E strings.)

Anyway, 3 months after I started, I bought my first six-string and never looked back. I now alternate between a 6 and a 7 string bass depending on the material. In general, I sincerely believe you should have as many strings as you can conveniently reach with your fingers (using proper technique). Much better to have a string and not need it, than to need it and not have it. And a wider range expands your musical horizons a whole lot.

I would say especially as a beginner, do not cramp your style as you learn bass. Later on, if you find you can't imagine more than an oom-pah bass line, get a washtub bass. But don't FORCE yourself into the oom-pah mode. Get some strings!
#35
i just buy the warwick one ... men thats one nice bass! (ill post a picture in the show ur bass thread )
#36
It's actually a Rockbass, but it's still a good deal. They are very good starter basses.

As forthe whole 4 vs 5 arguement, the only disadvantage of a 5 string is comfort(which covers closer string spacing etc). If an extra string confuses you after a while playing one, you are only making the stereotypicac guitarist response to bass true (i.e. you're a stupid moron).

However, this doesn't mean you will be comfortable with more than 4 strings. Some don't like the spacing. Some doen't like the wider neck. To some, the 5th string just feels alien, and 'in the way'.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#37
I'd recommend starting off on four. There's nothing that distracts from getting the basic technique down like having too much else to think about like utilising that B string or screwing around with a multi-fx or something, so I tend to suggest to beginners to keep it simple.

I am very much a 5 guy nowadays though.
#38
Quote by guylee
i have a fiver but tune the b string up to C so i can play songs that are in drop C without having to detune anything.


That's what I do when my band plays Dream Theater songs in C standard. And then I tune everything up half step. So Its like a 6 string in a way....I don't know. its hard to explain. Haha.
Quote by gallagher2006
Whats a Steve Vai? Floyd Rose ripoff?

Quote by Mr. Twelve
Behold...the Arctopus are obviously music. I don't see how anyone could say they're not music compared to many modern and post-modern composers. That being said, I think B...tA are terrible.
#39
im old school when it come to basses, like one wise man said once: somebody ****d up and put one too many strings over there... hehe but thats only my opinion, my problem right?
#40
Quote by Gibsocam
4 String Pros
-less strings to worry about
-strings have more room between them for slapping
-easier access to G string

4 String Cons
-smaller range
-slower access to certain notes

5 String Pros
-Larger range
-more strings for slap bassing
-less area between strings (can be a pro or con, depends on your playing style)

5 String Cons
-less access to higher notes
-larger bridge (yet again, depends on playing style)

I disagree with the points in bold, having a B string doesn't inhibit access to notes or strings. And also, wouldn't having a larger bridge be a pro because of the larger mass and better sustain?
Millie, my Peavey Grind Fiver
Peavey BAM 210 350w combo amp
Sansamp Bass Driver DI
Modded Ernie Ball VP Jr.
Monster Bass Cable, 21'

Quote by NakedBassist
Welcome to bass, you'll f*cking love it
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