#1
hi
can someone tell the open hand ( standard ) frequency of guitar strings?
and their interval form each other ?
and another question how many octave is between high E and low E ??
i think 2 is that right?
#2
^ I know A is 440 hz

try googling your question you might get a better result (or check a college course book)

and yes it is a 2 octave range between the low E and the high E
3 octave range if you count the high E all the way up to the 23rd fret (if there is one)
#3
A4 is 440Hz. Our two E strings are E2 and E4. The formula in relation to A440 is :

Frequency of pitch = 440 (2^(number of semitones above A4/12)) Hz

So just plug in your numbers to get:

E2 (low E) = 82.4068893
E4 (high e) = 329.627557

*note, use a negative value for number of semitones below A4
#4
Quote by isaac_bandits
A4 is 440Hz. Our two E strings are E2 and E4. The formula in relation to A440 is :

Frequency of pitch = 440 (2^(number of semitones above A4/12)) Hz

So just plug in your numbers to get:

E2 (low E) = 82.4068893
E4 (high e) = 329.627557

*note, use a negative value for number of semitones below A4
A0 = 27.5, and since that's the lowest pitched tone used in music, just use semitones above this. I'm not sure why you'd even base that forumla off of A4 rather than A0 (I mean, it works, it's just more work)
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#5
hi
thanks for info
i found something easier on web
each cent (semitone) is equal 1.0595 so if you have any frequency and multiply it by that ratio you get to next note
but a question here
i found that A note on fifth fret of low E (thick one) is 109.9 and open hand A string is 110 which they are very very closely the same
but their sounds differ
how?
sorry if its going to be mathematical rather than musical
#7
yes according to equal tempartment (which i think is the basic of today music )
the ratio of cent is that 1.0595
but i dont get about those two A diffrent sound but very close frequency
#8
Quote by Corwinoid
A0 = 27.5, and since that's the lowest pitched tone used in music, just use semitones above this. I'm not sure why you'd even base that forumla off of A4 rather than A0 (I mean, it works, it's just more work)


A4 is the standard musical pitch. It is what the concert master plays when the orchestra tunes, and what piano tuners base their tuning off of. Almost universally is 440Hz used for this, however through out history, other pitches have been used for this, and even then A4 has been the note used, not A0. The value of A0 is of course linked to A4, however, A4 is usually a whole number, but A0, as it is equal the frequency of A4/16 which is not always as nice of a number. as well, due to our ears inability to hear extreme pitches, it is best to tune to a midrange pitch, like A4, just because it is easier for the ear to hear whether or not that is in pitch.

You can use A0, but A4 is the standard musical pitch, and I will use it.
#9
Quote by isaac_bandits
A4 is the standard musical pitch. It is what the concert master plays when the orchestra tunes, and what piano tuners base their tuning off of. Almost universally is 440Hz used for this, however through out history, other pitches have been used for this, and even then A4 has been the note used, not A0. The value of A0 is of course linked to A4, however, A4 is usually a whole number, but A0, as it is equal the frequency of A4/16 which is not always as nice of a number. as well, due to our ears inability to hear extreme pitches, it is best to tune to a midrange pitch, like A4, just because it is easier for the ear to hear whether or not that is in pitch.

You can use A0, but A4 is the standard musical pitch, and I will use it.

Hey, don't get all defensive and stuff, I'm not criticizing, I'm just saying it's a lot easier to use A0... ET has always been based off of it (it's a mathematical system... A0 was definitely the base, since it's a piano tuning temper).

A few points... doing the math is not the same as tuning to something... when working with the math, I'm just saying it's easier to base it off of A0 than whatever pitch (I mean, you can use any of them, the base number just removes the entire negative/12 stuff). A4 isn't really a 'standard' pitch for anything other than instrument construction... I don't really want to go into why. That makes it somewhat convenient for other uses, but not really standard.

Also, an orchestra doesn't tune... you tune each person backstage and you have a show tuning. The note used to show tune is actually a pretty ****ty note to tune an orchestra to... at least for the instruments where it matters (usually the flutes, jesus, I'd rather have them know how far to lip over for G or B 90% of the time rather than A, and the strings are going to go sharp anyway).

Anyway, I'm not attacking you or anything... use whatever you want. I was just trying to be helpful *shrug*
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Last edited by Corwinoid at May 15, 2008,
#10
Quote by Corwinoid
Hey, don't get all defensive and stuff, I'm not criticizing, I'm just saying it's a lot easier to use A0... ET has always been based off of it (it's a mathematical system... A0 was definitely the base, since it's a piano tuning temper).

A few points... doing the math is not the same as tuning to something... when working with the math, I'm just saying it's easier to base it off of A0 than whatever pitch (I mean, you can use any of them, the base number just removes the entire negative/12 stuff). A4 isn't really a 'standard' pitch for anything other than instrument construction... I don't really want to go into why. That makes it somewhat convenient for other uses, but not really standard.

Also, an orchestra doesn't tune... you tune each person backstage and you have a show tuning. The note used to show tune is actually a pretty ****ty note to tune an orchestra to... at least for the instruments where it matters (usually the flutes, jesus, I'd rather have them know how far to lip over for G or B 90% of the time rather than A, and the strings are going to go sharp anyway).

Anyway, I'm not attacking you or anything... use whatever you want. I was just trying to be helpful *shrug*


OK, sorry about that. I personally find A4 easier, as I prefer to use negative numbers than have the coefficient involve decimals, even though it gives the same end result.
#12
First of all, a cent isn't a semitone. There are 100 cents between each semitone. You can hear a difference of about half a cent, between pitches, due to beating.

The difference between the fretted note and the open note can be cause by a lot of things... poor intonation on the instrument, poor instrument construction, poor tuning on the fretted string, weather, and a number of other factors.

Guitars are never in tune as you move up the neck.
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#13
What a fantastic instrument we play, it can't even be in tune with itself!
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#14
Quote by Ænimus Prime
What a fantastic instrument we play, it can't even be in tune with itself!
Most guitars have an intonation (or can be adjusted to have an intonation) with less that 3 or 4 cents of error. Thats barely noticable.
#15
sorry if i get you correctly you mean though those A have same frequency but not same sound because of guitar related matters ?
#16
109.9 and 110.0 are very different, in terms of frequency, at frequencies that low... they're not the same. Even if they were tuned the same, the farther up on the neck you get, the muddier a string will sound because of how it's carrying overtones on a different scale... so the fretted note has different overtone strengths, giving it a different sound, than the open note does. This is more obvious in the bass and mid ranges, because the pitches are so low and generate so many audible overtones.
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#18
Quote by z4twenny

and yes it is a 2 octave range between the low E and the high E
3 octave range if you count the high E all the way up to the 23rd fret (if there is one)


If you bend the 23rd fret on the high e to 24 then surely that would be 4 octaves from low E because 12th fret on high e is 3 octaves, isn't it?
#19
Quote by 12345abcd3
If you bend the 23rd fret on the high e to 24 then surely that would be 4 octaves from low E because 12th fret on high e is 3 octaves, isn't it?


You're right.

Of course, there are 24 frets (Ibanez's etc) and more (Sky Guitar).

In theory, if you tuned your low E down an octave and the High E up an octave, you'd have a 6 octave range.

But it'd be wierd to play.
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Last edited by Pure_Morning at May 16, 2008,
#20
Quote by Pure_Morning
You're right.

Of course, there are 24 frets (Ibanez's etc) and more (Sky Guitar).

In theory, if you tuned your low E down an octave and the High E up an octave, you'd have a 6 octave range.

But it'd be wierd to play.


Thanks for comfirming that. Also, you'd probably break your high e string tuning 1 octave up a make the low one unplayable.