#1
i know what they are, but i just don't know how much you can actually do with them. like, do you have to play them the way the notes are arranged, or can you just play any combination of notes in a scale? anyone got a good explanation or like a good link to a site?


thanks!
#3
Quote by gibson gangster
i know what they are, but i just don't know how much you can actually do with them. like, do you have to play them the way the notes are arranged, or can you just play any combination of notes in a scale? anyone got a good explanation or like a good link to a site?


thanks!


Scales are how everyone learns theory. Once you know the notes in a particular key or scale, you can use them to create music.

Most soloists that I've talked with have given me the following information.

1. Practice your scales everyday. You can do them throughout your practice session and be creative so your not just practicing a couple scales in the same way. Mix up your warm ups with tempo's and note values. Fast and slow. Triplets etc...

2. If scales are played everyday and memorized, soon you will start to incorporate them into your playing. You won't have to think about the scale and the notes inside it. You will just do it. Then you can solo like the masters.

To answer your questions. Scales used when soloing are just a combination of the diatonic notes. Sometimes they use all the notes, sometimes they don't. But all the notes sound good in the particular key. In essence, the scale or key is a guide for playing. Some soloists use arpeggios of scales. Which are individual notes of a particular chord or triad. And these are found commonly throughout music.
#5
Scales are basically the notes in a key all layed out in a row. So, the C major scale is all the notes in C major. Thus, you could be playing over a C major chord progression and use the C major scale(and by no means are you obligated to play them in order, they're basically your "safe notes" in a way) or writing something in C major and knowing you could pick notes or chords from the C major scale.
#6
In terms of the "play them in order" question, just look at it like this: in its basest form, music is simply different people using different orders of notes in specific scales.
#9
I know, but it sure is safer than a Db. I couldn't really think of a better way to say it, notes that are in key. Just trying to get it at a basic level but that's definitely a good point.

EDIT: ^I actually was going to mention the pentatonics but I figured that would be somewhat tangential.
#10
Chord tones are usually the most consonant notes (except the root in some circumstances). Than pentatonic notes. Than notes from a scale/mode that arent in the pentatonic scale. Than chromatic notes. Than microtonal notes.

Thats pretty much the way I see it.