#1
I want to find all 7 modes for melodic and harmonic minor tabbed out...I've had no luck thus far on the internet. Can anybody help me out?
"After while your cheap talk dont even cause me pain...so let your bullets fly like rain."
#3
eh I'd like the names also. Anything else?
"After while your cheap talk dont even cause me pain...so let your bullets fly like rain."
#4
The patterns are all the same. It doesn't matter where you play a scale.

If you don't know this and you think each mode has a position associated with it, then you shouldn't be worrying about modes of the major scale, let alone melodic and harmonic minor.
#5
I would like to learn the shapes associated with which mode I'm playing in. Such as the caged system in dealing with major modes. For example if you want to play a dorian over a minor 7th chord all one would have to is use the second shape. Now mellow out a bit and make a constructive comment instead of simply trying to tear others down?
"After while your cheap talk dont even cause me pain...so let your bullets fly like rain."
#6
^Yes, but you don't have to look at it as a shape because you don't need to begin on a specific note. For example, if you're playing in D Dorian, you don't have to start playing your melody on a D.

And she's not trying to tear you down, you're not a building. Chill out.
#7
I want shapes just for the sake of learning note association with the scale.

SO I guess I should say, what I want is a shape for each of the 7 melodic minor modes in one key, like the technique commonly used for major modes only transferred to melodic minor. So that would mean I'm looking for somewhere where I can view
1. Melodic Minor
2. Dorian b2 mode
3. Lydian Augmented mode
4. Lydian Dominant mode
5. Mixolydian b6 mode
6. Locrian #2 mode
7. Super Locrian mode
 
In tab form, in shapes starting on the E string with the pointer or middle finger- in order to make a nice and simple way to learn the modes of the melodic minor scale in a form that allows me to utilize the scale properly over any given chord or anywhere on the fretboard. After learning in one key the note associations are easily moved to any key that you need. Versus going through in each key and picking out every note of the scale transposed to that key all over the fretboard.
"After while your cheap talk dont even cause me pain...so let your bullets fly like rain."
Last edited by Renold at May 15, 2008,
#9
Quote by Renold
I would like to learn the shapes associated with which mode I'm playing in. Such as the caged system in dealing with major modes. For example if you want to play a dorian over a minor 7th chord all one would have to is use the second shape. Now mellow out a bit and make a constructive comment instead of simply trying to tear others down?


She's not tearing you down, she gave you a helpful suggestion (and she's entirely right)
You don't need to be worrying about modes until you're familiar with the theory behind the major scale. Once you're familiar with the major scale and the fretboard, you won't need to look up box shapes because you can simply alter whatever interval you need to on the spot. You aren't ready to be worrying about exotic scales.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Here ya go.

Although as said above, you really should just think of them as finger positions and
not as modes.




G Melodic Minor

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o | o | | 3
| | o | | | 4
o o o o o o 5
o | | | | o 6
| o o o o | 7
| | | | o o 8
| | | | | |


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o o o | | 5
o | | | | o 6
| o o o o | 7
o | o | o o 8
| o | o | | 9
| | | | o o 10
| | | | | |


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o | | | | | 6
| o o o | | 7
o | o | o o 8
| o | o | | 9
o o o | o o 10
| | | o o | 11
| | | | | o 12


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o | o | | | 8
| o | o | | 9
o o o | o o 10
| | | o o | 11
o o o o | o 12
| | | | o | 13
| | | | | o 14


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o o | | | 10 
| | | o o | 11
o o o o | o 12
| o | | o | 13
o | o o | o 14
| | | | o o 15
| | | | | |


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o o o | | 12
| o | | o | 13
o | o o | o 14
o o | o o o 15
| | o | | | 16 
| | | | o o 17
| | | | | |


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
| o | | | | 13
o | o o | | 14
o o | o o o 15
| | o | | | 16
o o o o o o 17
| | | | | o 18
| | | | o | 19




G Harmonic Minor


E A G D B E
| | | | | |
| | | | | |
o o | o | | 3
| | o | o | 4
o o o o | o 5
o o | | | o 6
| | o o o | 7
| | | | o o 8

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o o o | | 5
o o | | | o 6
| | o o o | 7
o | o o o o 8
| o | | | | 9
| | | | o o 10
| | | | | |

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o | | | | 6
| | o o | | 7
o | o o o o 8
| o | | | | 9
o o o | o o 10
| | | o o o 11
| | | | | |

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o | o o | | 8
| o | | | | 9
o o o | o o 10
o | | o o o 11
| o o o | | 12
| | | | o | 13
| | | | | o 14
| | | | | |

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o o o | | | 10
o | | o o o 11
| o o o | | 12
| o o | o | 13
o | | o | o 14
| | | | o o 15
| | | | | |

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
o | | | | | 11
| o o o | | 12
| o o | o | 13
o | | o | o 14
o o | o o o 15
| | o | o | 16
| | | | | o 17

E A G D B E
| | | | | |
| o o | | | 13
o | | o | | 14
o o | o o o 15
| | o | o | 16
o o o o | o 17
| | | | | o 18
| | | | o | 19


#11
Okay, Renold. If you want a "home" pattern, the way the 5th fret is "home" for the Am Pentatonic, just play whichever pattern contains the root on the E string and is the lowest note in the pattern. If you want A Harmonic Minor, the 5th fret is home. If you want e Phrygian Dominant, the 12th fret pattern is home.

But you need to understand that a pattern can be many scales depending on the context.
#12
if you know the modes...Playing the scales Renold listed is simple.
Follow the instructions...Lydian b2...Play the lydian with a b2.


Phyrgain dominate...play the Phyrgain with a 3rd instead of a b3rd.