#1
This is a little idea I had a while ago and I've finally got around to posting a thread about it. Basically, I was thinking about how when you sing, you have to sing in key, and if you've already played the key on say a piano or something, and then you try singing, you find that you normally sing the notes out of that scale. So it set me wondering, what about talking? When we talk, do we talk in different keys? For example, at the end of a sentence, do we finish it with a perfect cadence? Someone who sounds 'happy', are they talking in Lydian or Ionian? Someone who sounds threatening or menacing in Locrian or Phrygian? Natural talking voice Mixolydian or Dorian?

Discuss.
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#2
im pretty sure people don't talk in scales...they obviously talk in some key, which changes apon voice inflection...but i dont think there is any set pattern to it
'To be positive at all times is to ignore all that is important, sacred or valuable. To be negative at all times is to be threatened by ridiculousness and instant discredibility.'
-Kurt Cobain
#3
Alright cool. I don't really know to be honest, I just thought it was an interesting idea and wanted to know what other people thought/knew about it.
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#4
Our voices do vary in pitch, but the variations are too small and random to fit into any scale - it's all microtones. Steve Vai has done a couple of pieces where he's transcribed and then follows a vocal line, listen to "So Happy" from Flex-Able Leftovers and also "The Jazz Discharge Party Hats" and "The Dangerous Kitchen" from Zappas Man From Utopia album...he also said it was one of the most difficult things he ever did
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#5
^^ Like this... http://vai.com/LittleBlackDots/tempomental.html. Scroll all the way down to the last two images to see what I'm talking about. If you want to know about insane rhythmic ideas read the whole thing and try to not have your brain explode.

Oh, and you probably won't be able to read the rhythms of the "song" without reading a bit of the rest of the page.
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#6
Haha yeah, I've seen that before, Galvanise69 was trying to get me to explain it to him when he understood it better than I did. I sort of get it, but I don't know how you'd actually play those rhythms. It'd just confuse me.
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Last edited by Skater901 at May 28, 2008,
#9
yeah no

scales are a theoretical sequence of pleasurable sounds based on a couple hundred years of science and mathematical formulas


speech is something humans have , completely naturally had for thousands upon thousands of years ..
#10
I don't think talking is melodic, but it's definelty rhythmic. The art of speech making follows very strict rhythmic patterns, and some of the most natural people have been the world's ugliest characters - Hitler was a master of it. Link - Google

Also on a side note, it's this percussive form of using language that makes rapping an art form (in my eyes at least).
#11
Quote by Chris_Sleeps
I don't think talking is melodic, but it's definelty rhythmic. The art of speech making follows very strict rhythmic patterns, and some of the most natural people have been the world's ugliest characters - Hitler was a master of it. Link - Google

Also on a side note, it's this percussive form of using language that makes rapping an art form (in my eyes at least).


Well, speaking is kind of melodic. If you've ever heard any of Churchill's speaches he does have a kind of singing part to his voice.

Also, when you ask questions your voice goes up.

eg,
You can play guitar (normally)- a statement
You can play guitar? (goes high at the end)- a question
#12
I dont know about you guys but i end all my sentences with a perfect authentic cadence. It gives a good finishing touch and people always know when im done talking.
#13
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonal_language

Language is generally not diatonic or chromatic or melodic at all, but pitch is involved at varying degrees in different languages. In a nutshell, in English and similar languages changes in pitch can imply different meanings, like what 12345abcd3 said about questions. In some other languages, like Yoruba or Chinese, each syllable of a word must have a certain pitch to distinguish that word from other words which may use the same sounds, but with differnent pitches.