#1
Ok, so basically my band is just getting started we've jammed 3 times since we've filled the lineup last week. What we're going to do is play covers for the time being with a few originals that way we can get a decent following. But the band managing is all up to me and my drummer. Basically I want some good advice on how to lead the band in the right direction and make wise choices. Sorry if that's vague but that's as best as I can explain it. If there are any specific questions please ask them and maybe that will help get my point across better. Thanks for your time.

-Quark
Member #9 of the Carvin club
#2
Well, to start with, it's always good to have only 1 or 2 people managing the band; too many people managing becomes complicated especially when you're trying to get shows, and too many points of contact is a bad thing.

And i recommend not playing many shows till you've got a couple of originals; you don't want to be labeled as a cover band.

That's all i can think of right now, to be honest
#3
Well, me, the drummer, and bassist have been jamming for a while and have 4 complete songs and I have a few songs that I've written that can easily be formed into a whole band song. And I agree with having only one or two managers in a band. The reason I say me and the drummer is because we've known each other since we were 3 and we've talked our way in and out of things, we're like a team.
Member #9 of the Carvin club
#4
Quote by Adarsh

And i recommend not playing many shows till you've got a couple of originals; you don't want to be labeled as a cover band.




yeah


if you want to be an originals band, dont bother gigging with covers, wait till youve got your own material.

and avoid pay to play like the plague
#5
Keep a gig diary that as well as having your gig dates in, also has everybody's holidays or any other dates that they are definately busy on. It makes it easier to book gigs.
F'risnstance, if someone rings you up and asks you to play a gig, rather than ringing around everyone checking if everyone is available for the date, you can look in the diary and if the date is clear, book the gig then and there.

Allow an hour after each rehearsal to sit down and talk 'band business.' It's during these sit down meetings that anyone who has a date that they are going to be busy on, can put that date in the diary.
Do this religiously and the whole band should run pretty smoothly.
At these meetings, you should all have an equal say on what you want to do. (unless you're running a dictatorship)
Obviously not everyone is going to want to do the exact same things (if they do, be suspicious, that was far to easy and not natural at all between musicians ) but by voting and a bit of give and take, it should be possible to come up with a compromise between all of you.
Once you have that compromise, write it down. This is now your 'objective'
The rehearsals should now follow the objective. If anyone starts straying from the objective, they should be told that they are and the rest of the band should back up whoever has told them and say something like, 'Yeah, stop dicking about and let's just get on with what we came here to do!' then hound him until he complies.

Also, your diary should accompany you to any gigs, you never know when anyone will see you and want to give you a booking imediately. Besides, your diary, as well as having the date of gigs in it should also have how much the agreed wage for the gig was, the address of the gig, and the names and any contact numbers for the gig organisers, especialy mobile numbers, and the phone number of the venue itself.
F'rinstance, if you are on the way to a gig and your van breaks down, you have a mobile number for the organiser so you can ring the organiser and tell him what has happened and keep him posted on whether your going to be able to make it to the gig or not.
Or, if you're playing in a strange area, you have the address so it will make the venue easier to find.
Or, if someone asks you when and where they can see you again, you can look in the diary and tell them immediately.

Keep all the band's gear together because it's much easier to pick all the band's gear up in one place when you have a gig to play than to travel around everyone's houses and eventualy re-packing the van up to 4 or five times as gear is added. Stuff like that can make you late, which is obviously a big no no when you are trying to be a profesionally acting band.
Have boxes with spair leads, fuses, strings, sticks ect. in them and PLENTY of 'gaffer tape' (Gaffer tape is like the force, it has a light side, a dark side and it holds the universe together. Believe me, you will find LOADS of uses for this stuff ) and keep the boxes with your gear.
Boxes, whether they are metal or wooden or even plastic (but not cardboard) are better than bags, they stack up in the van and don't roll around and they keep your gear safer than bags. They're also useful for propping doors open when you're moving your gear or stacking up to place amps on. I've even known a band to have a set of boxes specialy made that as well as carrying all the bands small bits and pieces, (including the PA's multicore and microphones, mic stands and drum and cymble stands) also links together and makes quite a decent little drum riser.

Y'see, it's all about getting the band to work with maximum efficiency, once you get that happening, it makes your job as band leader a lot easier.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at May 15, 2008,
#6
Quote by FuzzyBear
yeah


if you want to be an originals band, dont bother gigging with covers, wait till youve got your own material.

and avoid pay to play like the plague



Around here the only way to get a good following is to start off with covers and originals, which is what we are doing. Our covers consist of prog rock, classic rock, classic metal, some modern rock, and then we just have some songs from random genres like some Elton John, Michael Jackson, Run DMC. But, these songs do flow in the set list. Our originals sound like prog rock, similar to Porcupine Tree.

Edit: Thanks to the guy above me for the advice. That helps out a lot!
Member #9 of the Carvin club
#7
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Keep a gig diary that as well as having your gig dates in, also has everybody's holidays or any other dates that they are definately busy on. It makes it easier to book gigs.
F'risnstance, if someone rings you up and asks you to play a gig, rather than ringing around everyone checking if everyone is available for the date, you can look in the diary and if the date is clear, book the gig then and there.

Allow an hour after each rehearsal to sit down and talk 'band business.' It's during these sit down meetings that anyone who has a date that they are going to be busy on, can put that date in the diary.
Do this religiously and the whole band should run pretty smoothly.
At these meetings, you should all have an equal say on what you want to do. (unless you're running a dictatorship)
Obviously not everyone is going to want to do the exact same things (if they do, be suspicious, that was far to easy and not natural at all between musicians ) but by voting and a bit of give and take, it should be possible to come up with a compromise between all of you.
Once you have that compromise, write it down. This is now your 'objective'
The rehearsals should now follow the objective. If anyone starts straying from the objective, they should be told that they are and the rest of the band should back up whoever has told them and say something like, 'Yeah, stop dicking about and let's just get on with what we came here to do!' then hound him until he complies.

Also, your diary should accompany you to any gigs, you never know when anyone will see you and want to give you a booking imediately. Besides, your diary, as well as having the date of gigs in it should also have how much the agreed wage for the gig was, the address of the gig, and the names and any contact numbers for the gig organisers, especialy mobile numbers, and the phone number of the venue itself.
F'rinstance, if you are on the way to a gig and your van breaks down, you have a mobile number for the organiser so you can ring the organiser and tell him what has happened and keep him posted on whether your going to be able to make it to the gig or not.
Or, if you're playing in a strange area, you have the address so it will make the venue easier to find.
Or, if someone asks you when and where they can see you again, you can look in the diary and tell them immediately.

Keep all the band's gear together because it's much easier to pick all the band's gear up in one place when you have a gig to play than to travel around everyone's houses and eventualy re-packing the van up to 4 or five times as gear is added. Stuff like that can make you late, which is obviously a big no no when you are trying to be a profesionally acting band.
Have boxes with spair leads, fuses, strings, sticks ect. in them and PLENTY of 'gaffer tape' (Gaffer tape is like the force, it has a light side, a dark side and it holds the universe together. Believe me, you will find LOADS of uses for this stuff ) and keep the boxes with your gear.
Boxes, whether they are metal or wooden or even plastic (but not cardboard) are better than bags, they stack up in the van and don't roll around and they keep your gear safer than bags. They're also useful for propping doors open when you're moving your gear or stacking up to place amps on. I've even known a band to have a set of boxes specialy made that as well as carrying all the bands small bits and pieces, (including the PA's multicore and microphones, mic stands and drum and cymble stands) also links together and makes quite a decent little drum riser.

Y'see, it's all about getting the band to work with maximum efficiency, once you get that happening, it makes your job as band leader a lot easier.


You've been in too many bands
#10
Quote by thedefrockednun
slacker as always you win the post.
i look up to you lol.


Awwwwww.... shucks.

Last edited by SlackerBabbath at May 17, 2008,
#11
lol anytime,

back to the subject, the key is actually to stay organised like slackeer said, be friendly to ur band members, be strict if things tend to loose control, otherwise just saty cool and relaxed, you and the drummer shud manage the band but dont forget to listen to the other members, dont be a "band dictator" itll just end up being ugly.
Last edited by thedefrockednun at May 19, 2008,
#12
Practice setting up and tearing down as a skill.

Work towards your first impression. Don't put up a myspace with crappy demos. Don't play shows with "4 or 5 songs me and my drummer jammed together and came up with". Write 12 songs and pick the best 6. Be professional and respectable from your first public appearance. Don't act like kids, ever. When you do make a myspace, put good pictures on there, have a clean, good layout, and keep the band members out of the top 8.
#13
Thanks for the help guys! Yesterday we had practice and we implemented these ideas. After we we practiced we sat down for an hour or so and discussed what we all had in mind for the band and whatnot. Things are looking good and everyone is working together in the most efficient way.
Member #9 of the Carvin club
#14
Quote by Quark Soup
Thanks for the help guys! Yesterday we had practice and we implemented these ideas. After we we practiced we sat down for an hour or so and discussed what we all had in mind for the band and whatnot. Things are looking good and everyone is working together in the most efficient way.

Y'know, it's really nice when guys come back after taking your advice and let you know how things are going. It also let's you know if your advice sucks or not.
Cheers!
#15
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Y'know, it's really nice when guys come back after taking your advice and let you know how things are going. It also let's you know if your advice sucks or not.
Cheers!


I totally agree.

I also read some of your advice in the "Clearing Up a Few PA Questions" thread. You make some excellent points about the "band money". My drummer and I have been talking about how we would handle those sorts of issues and I think we might have found our answer. You are full of useful advice. Thanks!!
Member #9 of the Carvin club
#16
Quote by Quark Soup
I totally agree.

I also read some of your advice in the "Clearing Up a Few PA Questions" thread. You make some excellent points about the "band money". My drummer and I have been talking about how we would handle those sorts of issues and I think we might have found our answer. You are full of useful advice. Thanks!!

Anytime bud.