#1
HAIL BRETHERNS!!!

I have been playing guitar for a while now, what I have always done is to download some tab from a nice song and to try to learn it.

Mostly I've played spanish guitar, but recently I've decided to focus a lot more on electric guitar and to learn music properly, reading theory etc

One of the things I've read is that practicing with a Metronome is a must, cause it helps you to develop your sense of rythm and timing.

My question is if I should buy a Metronome to practice with it or am I ok only with Guitar Pro? it looks to me like Guitar Pro has all I need to develop my skills.

So? should I get a metronome anyway?
#5
Yeah you still need a metronome. You need to get used to playing with a steady beat behind you, and GP you're more playing along with the the guitar part than actually playing to the beat.
#6
A true metronome is no longer necessary. Click tracks on PT and GP will work fine. However, spend some time playing to JUST the click track, not the music in GP.
#7
Guitar pro has a built in metronome/click track... and you can just play over drums lines on it as well, more fun!
Quote by cakemonster91

*chuckle* A peanut. With a face.



Go to your staff paper and re-write this song a half step down so on the paper it'll be like you have a "C" just move it down to a "B#"




Know your theory, then play like you don't.

#8
well, what I do is to learn the songs, then mute the guitars and I play over bass and drums? isnt that enough?
#9
Quote by Gacel
well, what I do is to learn the songs, then mute the guitars and I play over bass and drums? isnt that enough?


Yeah, it should be unless the bass or the drums is playing a very similar rythm to you, which is not just playing on the beat. The whole point of muting the guitar part is to make you play the rythm on your own so if the drums or the bass have a similar rythm to you then mute them aswell. Also try playing with nothing but the clicks.

This is assuming you just want to build up your sense of rythm. If you are practising a song to play in a band them keeping the bass and drums is a very good idea because then you can hear how all the parts fit together.
#10
Playing to a single, steady repeating click is the best way to ensure that your fully in control of your timing, and is important.

However, most of your time as a musician will be spent playing to a rhythm, not a single repeating click. I've found that when I focused only on exact on the beat timing for too long, my ability to play to difficult rhythms was somewhat hindered. With some latin/fusion beats, counting just isn't feasible. Important as exact timing is, the overall pulse of the music, the rhythm, is more important.

I would recommend that you get a drum machine, spend time practicing exact timing to a simple click and to also spend time finding beats and learning to play over them.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#11
Quote by Prophet of Page
Playing to a single, steady repeating click is the best way to ensure that your fully in control of your timing, and is important.


There is a lot of truth to this, and it's just something you can't get from playing along with songs in GP (unless you're just using a click track or the built in metronome).

Anyway, I started out ignoring the metronome and just playing along with GP. As I got better I noticed certain timing issues popping up, and occasionally I'd kind of get lost within the beat, especially if our bands drummer was feeling creative (he's a monster of a jazz drummer trapped in a rock band)

So on advice I started practicing everything with just a click track. At first it was a really awkward and difficult to get used to. But it basically forced me to start paying attention to what I was playing instead of just basing timing on feel.

Personally, I use GP to learn and memorize songs, and then a metronome to perfect them.