#1
How do you remember like for example, the minor pentatonic is

R b3 4 5 b7

how do you remember that for every scale you use?
#3
Eventually you'll just remember after playing it all over the neck. Just learn all the patterns.
#4
hours of practice playing it

not to mention a general understanding of what the scale entails. for example; the minor pentatonic scale is somewhat the way you put it. the root, the minor third, hence the "minor pentatonic" of it, the perfect fourth, the perfect fifth the minor seventh and the root again. that then has a distinct pattern on the fretboard that you will get accustomed to seeing, hearing and playing.
#5
Quote by filthylittleboy
for example; the minor pentatonic scale is somewhat the way you put it.

What are you talking about? The way he put it, 1 b3 4 5 7, is exactly the way to put it.
#6
easy, learn the notes instead

for example in c: C D# F G A#

or, instead, learn the shapes on the guitar neck of the particular scale you want. the f major pentatonic, for example, is :
e|--------------------------5-8-|
G|---------------------6-8------|
B|----------------5-7-----------|
D|-----------5-7----------------|
A|------5-8---------------------|
E|-5-8--------------------------|

learn it and move it around the guitar for any pentatonic

or use number lines:
major scale 2212221
minor scale 2122122
major pent 22323
minor pent 32322

email me if you want more info
#8
they are in fact the same notes, i just write that way because it keeps the notes as one of each in the major scale ie cdefgabc def#gabc#d

only difference is in f: FGABbCDEF
#9
Quote by lesd3vil
they are in fact the same notes, i just write that way because it keeps the notes as one of each in the major scale ie cdefgabc def#gabc#d

only difference is in f: FGABbCDEF

Yes, but you're writing a minor scale, and the entire C natural minor scale is spelled C D Eb F G Ab Bb. Since the minor pentatonic derives from that, you want to use consistent note names.
#10
i always use sharps fella, unless like i said it needs a flat to keep the scale as abcdefg... i am consistent in my own mind

besides, never did me no harm to learn that way

plus i'm almost completely self taught so i think you can give a little on the complexities of writing theory :P
#11
Quote by lesd3vil
i always use sharps fella, unless like i said it needs a flat to keep the scale as abcdefg... i am consistent in my own mind

besides, never did me no harm to learn that way

plus i'm almost completely self taught so i think you can give a little on the complexities of writing theory :P

You may do that, but it's convention to write things properly; otherwise other musicians will be confused because they're not in your mind. It doesn't do any harm but it's incorrect and potentially very confusing.

I'm almost entirely self-taught as well, so that doesn't have anything to do with it; plus, this is not a complexity, it's simply writing out a scale.
#12
I remember basic scales as derivates of the 3 note per string Major/minor shapes. So lydian is major with a #4, phrygian is minor with a b2 etc...

But more complicated scales (whole tone, diminshed) I just remember as shapes at the minute becase I don't know the notes of the fretboard well enough just yet.
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#13
Quote by lesd3vil
plus i'm almost completely self taught so i think you can give a little on the complexities of writing theory :P
Well here's a rule to learn: When writing a standard Western scale (everything you'll ever use), a letter cannot be repeated. C minor cannot be written C D D#; it must be C D Eb. D# is completely wrong.


Easy rule. Follow it.
#14
fair do's man, but we all learn different ways.

besides, i think it's better to learn the 'shapes' rather than the 'notes' as such. if i know the notes that's fair enough but that's not gonna help me play if i have to think, 'right, where's a c for the next note in the scale'...

i know the pentatonics shapes perfectly and can improvise fluidly in them, but can i name every note off the top of my head? you're joking right? :P

i've only been playing a year too
#15
jeesh, i post trying to help a guy out and people have a go at me for my methods of learning...
#16
Quote by lesd3vil
fair do's man, but we all learn different ways.

besides, i think it's better to learn the 'shapes' rather than the 'notes' as such. if i know the notes that's fair enough but that's not gonna help me play if i have to think, 'right, where's a c for the next note in the scale'...

i know the pentatonics shapes perfectly and can improvise fluidly in them, but can i name every note off the top of my head? you're joking right? :P

i've only been playing a year too

Learning the notes is going to help you a whole lot when it comes to improvising and reading music, and you'll learn how specific notes fit together rather than being restricted to shapes. If you ever want to become serious about guitar, I (and many others) would strongly suggest learning the notes.

And you don't have to learn a million notes; simply learn the formula for the scale and apply it based off of any root you can think of.

I have an exam to go to, but I'll be back to answer the TS's question, I've gone a little off topic here.

By the way, don't double post; use the edit button in the bottom-right corner of your posts.
#17
Quote by doubtfull
How do you remember like for example, the minor pentatonic is

R b3 4 5 b7

how do you remember that for every scale you use?

The same way you remebered that the alphabet is ABCDE etc, or how to spell words, or that 2+2=4...you learn.
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#18
Quote by lesd3vil
fair do's man, but we all learn different ways.

You're method is incorrect.

If it works for you, fine. I think about things in incorrect terms all the time. For instance, I wrote a piece on my guitar tuned down 1/2 step. I refer to it as "G# Minor" rather than "Ab" since I prefer to think of it as the relative minor of B rather than Cb. However, I don't teach people incorrect ideas. You must first understand the rules before you break them.

Quote by lesd3vil
besides, i think it's better to learn the 'shapes' rather than the 'notes' as such. if i know the notes that's fair enough but that's not gonna help me play if i have to think, 'right, where's a c for the next note in the scale'...
Shapes are important, but you've got to know the notes, or at least the intervals and sounds.

Quote by lesd3vil
i know the pentatonics shapes perfectly and can improvise fluidly in them, but can i name every note off the top of my head? you're joking right? :P
I bet you know what a note will sound like though. And I bet you can name if after thinking for a moment.

Quote by lesd3vil
i've only been playing a year too
That isn't an excuse for giving out incorrect information. You must recognize where you lack knowledge.


Sorry to crush you, but I don't like when incorrect information is posted on this forum.

#19
As for the fretboard. There's many way to learn it.
It depends what you use as a refernce piont.
Some people just bar their index finger to identify the root.
Starting from the top E string same fret , the next string below
is the 4. The next string below that is the b7.

Right handed guitar.....
I just use the simple power chord. Root, 5th ,Octive
If i count from the 5th....I guess, two frets to the right is 1 whole step, which is the 6.
Two frets to the left is the 4. I use the same tech. for the other strings.
It's not rocket science.lol

I guess if it say...b6...I'll only play one fret up from the 5th.
If it say b3, I'll play two frets down from the 4th.
Last edited by Ordinary at May 15, 2008,