#1
What are the modes you could use over a E minor progression that has power chords mostly? I have posted a few times that if you are in the key of A minor using power chords you could use the g mixolydian, A minors, C major, D dorian, and phrygian but many people say u can't do that but why is my question?
#2
The backing chords determine the progression. Over an Em progression, you can use the notes E F# G A B C D anywhere on the neck. However, you call it E Minor, not F# Locrian or anything else.

A pattern does not have a specific mode associated with it. You can use any pattern of the E minor scale, but it's called Em.
#3
The ones you listed are all just modes of C major. With modes they all have the same notes in the same order, so what you gotta do is figure out what scale you want to play in not what mode, then figure out the modes of that scale and that's how you move it around the neck
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#4
Quote by weez13
The ones you listed are all just modes of C major. With modes they all have the same notes in the same order, so what you gotta do is figure out what scale you want to play in not what mode, then figure out the modes of that scale and that's how you move it around the neck
Um, no. You can't play F# Locrian over an Em progression. That's just not what it's called.

Remember, scales are not patterns, boxes, or positions. They are groups of notes that exist all over the neck.
#6
Quote by mjkshreds
but why would it matter if u play the same notes just in a different order, that is what u r doing anyway when u improvise out of scales
It doesn't matter. It's called E minor if it's over an Em progression.
#7
Quote by mjkshreds
but why would it matter if u play the same notes just in a different order, that is what u r doing anyway when u improvise out of scales


The modes are scales in their own right, with their own unique sound, and unique formula.

Its not that you cant play F# locrian over an E minor progression..... its that it wont SOUND like F# locrian, it will sound like E minor. Your better off just thinking of it as E minor.
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
The modes are scales in their own right, with their own unique sound, and unique formula.

Its not that you cant play F# locrian over an E minor progression..... its that it wont SOUND like F# locrian, it will sound like E minor. Your better off just thinking of it as E minor.


Well technically can't you FORCE it. Meaning, hold out all the "stable" (im putting it in quotes because Locrian is so unstable) notes of that mode, even if it doesn't correlate with the progression under you? It'll just sound like absolute garbage -.-
#9
Quote by ouchies
Well technically can't you FORCE it. Meaning, hold out all the "stable" (im putting it in quotes because Locrian is so unstable) notes of that mode, even if it doesn't correlate with the progression under you? It'll just sound like absolute garbage -.-

That's just an aside to his point though. The point is that you can play the F# Locrian scale, there's nothing stopping you. However, you're not playing in the F# Locrian mode at that point.
#10
Quote by :-D
That's just an aside to his point though. The point is that you can play the F# Locrian scale, there's nothing stopping you. However, you're not playing in the F# Locrian mode at that point.


Oh okay I get it.

But to the TS, depending on the progression, you may be able to borrow notes from different scales/modes over certain chords.