#1
Any special instructions on painting a pickguard? Any specific paint?

I want to paint my Squier strats pickguard a candy apple red?

I have never painted anything in my life and definately dont wanna ruin anything. It's also a lefty guitar so if I screw anything up, I won't be able to get a pickguard without special ordering it and waiting...

Can someone point me in the right direction?

This is strictly the pickguard, no wood involved. How would a clear coat benefit for me, or would it not in this case?
Last edited by etays69 at May 16, 2008,
#2
Hrm... definately a touchy topic... As you mentioned, clear coat or not...

It entirely depends on what you want.....

For one of my guitars, I take to all the concerts I attend and let all the artists sign in Non-Toxic marker (easy to rub off).

This kind of signing will distort with a clear coat.

So if i wanted to make it permanent, I would start with a polyester style paint(hint hint nudge nudge) so stick to the plastic. Then with a clear coat, some kind of urethane(be careful, this has to be applied in thin, i mean thin!!! coats... so get fine brushes and take your time with this)
Quote by SungWismyName
What does sustain,pickup, and humblewockey(its wrong but it sounds liek this) mean on electric guitars?
#3
start with a plastic primer, then just use any kind of spray paint really. i did mine lime green. its pretty awesome.
#4
Quote by etays69
Any special instructions on painting a pickguard? Any specific paint?

I want to paint my Squier strats pickguard a candy apple red?

I have never painted anything in my life and definately dont wanna ruin anything. It's also a lefty guitar so if I screw anything up, I won't be able to get a pickguard without special ordering it and waiting...

Can someone point me in the right direction?

This is strictly the pickguard, no wood involved. How would a clear coat benefit for me, or would it not in this case?
It's Post #3 in the Sticky - click!

Originally Posted by Ippon
If you want the paint to not scuff or peel, you need to use:



You have 2 options with Acrylic Paint for Plastic:

1. Paint for Plastic Primer + Acrylic Colorcoat Paint; or,
2. Paint for Plastic Colorcoat.


With either options, you need to lightly scuff sand. Use 400 grit, nothing coarser, or else the scratches will be too deep/rough. 600 is better.

With option 1, you'll have more choices with the colocoat. For example, if you decide on an elaborate or intricate design, the primer for plastic will serve as your base. This is best if your design is at least 3 or more colors.

Here's a sample:



With option 2, you can stick with a simple 1- or 2-color design. Here's a sample:



It is best to use Clearcoat on Option 1. Clearcoating is optional on Option 2.

Remember, Paint for Plastic will form a molecular bond with your PickGuard's plastic.

Good Luck!